For the love of copper
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2,121 posts in this topic

@Quintus Arrius:

   My own grade for the 1909-S would be F-VF (F 15), but I've seen pieces that look like this graded as high as VF 25 by grading services. (Both of us probably learned grading during the era of Photograde, whose standards I still prefer for circulated coins.) I think its price was $95, plus $2 shipping (cheaper in 1989), for a total of $97.  

   My grade for the 1877 would be VG 10, but it could go F 12 at NGC, although the weak right upper obverse rim and minor surface issues could pull it down to VG 8.  Grading always involves some subjectivity!

   I'll edit the posts to show the NGC grades when I receive them.

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@Sandon:

Fair enough.

On the only cross-grade submission I believe I have ever submitted to a TPGS, I included a hand-printed notation on the form stating, in effect, I am only looking for an honest, accurate grade, irrespective of where the chips may fall----and will not contest the opinion or determination made.

 

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On 11/13/2022 at 8:09 PM, Coin Cave said:

This coin probably should have received a PL attribution.

DSCN3103.JPG

DSCN3106.JPG

 

I don't know about a PL attribution, but is this date supposed to have the initials V.D.B. on the shoulder, and if so, can you see it?  Tks.

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On 11/13/2022 at 8:09 PM, Coin Cave said:

This coin probably should have received a PL attribution.

DSCN3103.JPG

DSCN3106.JPG

DSCN3102.JPG

In all fairness, on reflection, MS-66 RD doesn't come close to doing this coin justice. (Remember that scene in "No Time For Sergeants," where Andy Griffith is designated a PLO, or Permanent Latrine Orderly?)  Well, this ought to be an EMF, for Electric Molten Finish.  PL is too tame for this.  (thumbsu

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On 12/14/2022 at 9:10 AM, leeg said:

c1580b0a-8ebb-4173-982d-d1df9b679bfd.png.d99694d2c8c0a44523956d6f3fa30da7.png0a596959-91c3-42ed-a939-9f036fd44849.png.c42e172bc08ef84da23f43b0bfd1e03e.png

Pardon my impertinence, but I should  like to know what, if known, would cause such a surface as this to develop on a coin?  The overall features of the coin appear to be incredibly detailed--in short--fully struck.  

The coin suggests encapsulation at some point.  The autumnal touch on the left side of the wreath, also apparent to a lesser extent elsewhere, suggests exposure and/or contact with a foreign agent or gas.  But what of the date and legends?  The numerals exhibit traces of kwashiorkor, a protein deficiency.   I am not so interested in the grade which would not begin to explain the phenomena observed here. Granted, the detail is extraordinarily precise and very well-defined, but it is the multi-colored fields that interest me. 

Don't get me wrong!  I like the coin but it raises many more question than it answers.  Since we are not talking proof or traces of original mint luster--or even evidence of wear in the usual sense, I would like you to describe what it was that not only drew your eye to this coin, but prompted you to reach for your pocket and purchase it. I cannot recall ever seeing another coin like it.

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