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I paid through the nose for L. Brown's text on the subject so I figure I've got to look at a few medals. Here's a George III 50th year of reign medal, 52mm, in white metal. Obverse is PL but not obvious from the image. Bit of a mystery tho. Is that someone's attempt to hole the medal above George's head? Seems like it might have been lacquered as well from the look of George's cheek and the reverse fields. Anyone familiar with these things and how they might have been handled/stored?

 

MergedGeorgeIII1809BHM652.jpg

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You could check for lacquer pits on the surface if you have a microscope ? it should build in the tiny areas that are pits, anywhere there is a mark or indentation might have a reservoir of substance wink.gif

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Yarm,

 

Very nice, I have seen that piece before and am always amazed at the three dimensional appearance.

 

Here is a new one for me, a gift from my father today, was in his desk just sitting there by itself. 1772 2 Reales.

 

Rey

 

17722RealesObv.jpg

 

17722RealesRev.jpg

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Just got back from vacation to find one of Jacques Wiener's architectural medals. This man did nice work!
That's another sweet medal! The Ben Weiss Collection website has a number (all?) of Wiener's Belgium and European architectural medals. The ten Belgium medals also come as a set in an original box (larger image available here):

 

526_small1.JPG

 

 

 

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Thanks Bobby,

 

The Reale was just loose in his desk. Of course very circulated and worn but when I photographed it, it just made it look great. Some of these circulated coins have such an interesting character about them.....

 

This Katherine 5 Kopecks was a paperweight on his desk (till I rescued it today acclaim.gif). A sister coin to this one is already an official part of the collection and is a double/over date 1785/6.

 

Rey

 

17855KopecksRev.jpg

 

17855KopecksObv.jpg

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That's a neat 2 Reales, Rey. Did you notice the inverted mint mark and assayer initials?

 

My Goldberg lot finally arrived yesterday and I had a chance to photograph it today. It's in an NGC AU50 holder, which compliments my "other" 1814, which is a "no dot before HISPAN" variety. There are a few vertical scratches on the holder, which appeared on the picture, but I used that lighting angle anyway, because it brought-out the coins' luster. There is a slight die rotation present, as well as some die rust on the reverse (around "8R"). The piece I already possessed also exhibits die rust on the reverse, which makes me wonder if this is one of the characteristics of this mint...

 

NEWP:

 

Mexico-Guadalajara-1814-goldberg.jpg

 

OLDP:

 

Mexico-Guadalajara-18142.jpg

 

Some history behind the mint at Guadalajara, taken from "Numismatic History of Mexico" and "Compendium VIII Reales":

 

Cristobal de Onate, one of the captains under Nuno de Guzman, founded the City of Guadalajara on March 16, 1532, but for various reasons the site selected was changed twice, and it was not until February 11, 1542, that the present location was chosen. As Commander Guzman was born in Guadalajara, Spain, the new settlement was given this name in his honor.

 

The opening of the Guadalajara mint was caused, as in the other provisional mints, by the War of Independence; but the removal of the assayer and the insistent demands of Don Ambrosio Sagarsurrieta, Fiscal of the Royal Treasury, brought about its closing April 30, 1815. It was re-opened in 1818, due to the efforts of the President of the Council, Field Marshal Don Jose de la Cruz, only to be closed again the latter part of the same year. The reason offered by the official documents consulted was the untimely death of the assayer, but as some of the coinage of 1818 carries the assayer's initials FS, which are also found on the coins of 1820, 1821, 182, and 1823, there must have been some other motive.

 

Official records state that this mint was not re-opened until August 21, 1821. This must be an error, because coins bearing the Guadalajara mint mark (Ga) are found for 1820.

 

Herrera, in El Duro, pp. 30-31, asserts that the Guadalajara mint was striking Ferdinand VII pesos during 1822 and 1823. Pradeau mentions that he has seen only two-reales pieces bearing the 1822 date and the Guadalajara mint mark.

 

The Guadalajara mint was the only one of the provisional mints existing during the War of Independence which was permitted to coin gold.

 

In this series there exists the perhaps unique case of an overdate of 1821 over 1822.

 

 

Cheers,

 

~Roman

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Roman,

 

Very nice coins and an excellent explanation of history.

 

Thank you for the heads up on the 2 Reale, believe it or not I had not noticed the inverted mint mark and assayer's initials. Do you have any more information regarding this and what the affect on the rarity/value, etc. of this coin?

 

Thanks,

 

Rey

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Hi Rey,

 

Not sure about the smaller pieces, but all of the 8 Reales of 1772 have inverted MM/Assayer initials. 1772 was the first year of "portrait" design, so it could be a number of reasons why it happened. In 1773, there are 2 types - inverted and "normal", with inverted being the scarcer of the two.

 

The only "correct" 1772 piece known is in the Museum of Mexico, according to Calbeto.

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My World Gold purchases have been a little slow lately .. other priorities smile.gif

but

Here is a rare coin I've been looking for several years and I just recieved notice I was high bidder, so hopefully it will be in my hands within a week or two.

 

Austria Salzburg

1782 Dukat (Hieronymus von Colloredo)

Friedberg#887

00794q00-Obverse.jpg00794q00-rev.jpg

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Yarm - Interesting piece there, another one with nice appeal.

 

Silvereagle, like the Ducat as well, congratulations on the win.

 

Rey

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This crest appears on quite a few British tokens but often comes with a mushy strike due to the high relief. Here's one I was happy to find with a good strike.

 

MergedDublin3262.jpg

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The start of my 1937 proof set is the 2 pound. NGC PF66 Cameo

 

2pound.jpg

 

And picked up this lustrous 1895-S Sov NGC MS64

 

1895s.jpg

 

But my favourite recent acquisition is the 2007 Subscription coin, a recreation of the most valuable coin (4 pounds) in Australia's proclamation of 1800. The 1732 Gold Johanna, or 12800 Reis

 

johanna1.jpg

johanna2.jpg

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I wish this one was gold but it is a 51 mm gilt bronze medal (BHM 2992)

struck by Boehm and Morgan for the 1874 International Exhibition.

The edge is inscribed with an exhibitor's name and catalogue #. Neat

little leather box as well.

 

Merged1875BHM2.jpg

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