1922 silver dollar
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13 posts in this topic

Hi everyone.  New here and I was hoping someone could help me tell if my coin is a proof and would it be worth grading?

I also have 2 coins I think are mint errors I will post next for help if anyone can. I would have posted all together  but didn't want to be confusing.

If I need a better picture let me know. 

16539674200228302189905714587194.jpg

16539675526678539248225112488408.jpg

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No, it's not a proof and would not be worth grading. You could buy a nicer version of the coin for the cost of having it slabbed.

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Welcome to the forum.   Agreed it is not a proof coin, it is a very nice coin for an album but would not really grade high enough to be worth the cost financially.

Also I would highly recommend that you hold all your coins by the edges only, human skin has many oils and those oils can leave fingerprints on the surface of coins and ruin any numismatic value.

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On 5/31/2022 at 1:27 PM, JKK said:

How about you actually explain these things to the OP rather than ask questions you know good and well they can't answer? This is the newbie forum. Newbies often don't understand the difference between proofs and really shiny business strikes. You could help them, and certainly have the knowledge to do so.

I'm asking because the OP must have some basis for thinking the coin is a proof. After hearing back, I plan to then provide the information. This is standard educational methodology that includes engaging the student -- but it also determines if the student is receptive to the information. (A similar approach is used for assessing the relative reliability of research information.)

:)

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On 5/31/2022 at 12:24 PM, RWB said:

I'm asking because the OP must have some basis for thinking the coin is a proof. After hearing back, I plan to then provide the information. This is standard educational methodology that includes engaging the student -- but it also determines if the student is receptive to the information. (A similar approach is used for assessing the relative reliability of research information.)

:)

Then let me help you in turn. Newbies tend to think "really shiny" = proof. That's the most common basis, and they're usually incorrect. Another way to assess the student's receptivity is to ask whether they'd like to know what's wrong with the picture, and the advantage there is that it doesn't sound like you're being sarcastic with someone who does not know the things that you know. The types of queries appropriate for an undergraduate classroom are not necessarily as functional in this venue, and good educational methods adapt to the audience and situation.

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Posted (edited)
On 5/31/2022 at 12:39 PM, RWB said:

Can you describe a "1922" proof? (high or low relief)

What makes you think your coin is a "proof." How were proof Peace dollars made?

Ya ,I was even scared when I saw your post and I know you know ....LoL....

Edited by J P Mashoke
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People learn best if they express what it is they see that causes a specific conclusion. Beating them over the cranium with answers - which they are not prepared to understand - before they have been able to describe a situation or opinion, only produces greater confusion.

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On 5/31/2022 at 4:54 PM, RWB said:

People learn best if they express what it is they see that causes a specific conclusion. Beating them over the cranium with answers - which they are not prepared to understand - before they have been able to describe a situation or opinion, only produces greater confusion.

Jesus. Well, I'll know not to bother with that again.

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On 5/31/2022 at 7:56 PM, JKK said:

Jesus. Well, I'll know not to bother with that again.

I understand the confusion and frustration. When someone writes, "Is this a proof?" we can respond "No - and here's how proof were made/or here's the differences." But what that does not determine is the questioner's individual understanding of the words they used. Getting that 'out of the way' first, opens the door to an explanation.

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On 5/31/2022 at 7:05 PM, RWB said:

I understand the confusion and frustration. When someone writes, "Is this a proof?" we can respond "No - and here's how proof were made/or here's the differences." But what that does not determine is the questioner's individual understanding of the words they used. Getting that 'out of the way' first, opens the door to an explanation.

Teacher as facilitator helps the learner own the education. 

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On 6/16/2022 at 2:32 AM, vixencanoeing said:

Are you a teacher? I use this approach with my students at the college. It helps me a lot to understand the level of their engagement. After that, I can rebuild my program a little and give them more space for creativity. But sometimes, I should remind them of the importance of their education process. I found a lot of information while preparing for the lesson on this theme. It curious me because it's a source https://writix.co.uk/essay-examples/importance-of-education with writing tasks help, but there is a lot of helpful information. I'm a little off the topic now, but I just wanted to say that I don't think it's a good idea to use this approach in such a space as this forum. 

I don't think it is a good idea to use this forum for your spam. That is why I reported your post. 

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