Having a "matched" set - how important is it?
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16 posts in this topic

Quality and eye appeal are the are driving forces in any set/collection.  I totally get that.  However, I was talking to a friend who was saying that it is even better if all of the coins are exactly the same grade.  For instance, he is collecting Franklin Halves in MS64FBL.  He would not buy a 65FBL, even if the cost were the same as the 64.  I have seen this taken a step further, and have seen collectors that will only buy one TPG... and further yet, a particular label.

I am of the mindset that I want quality coins.  I keep my coins similar in look/feel, but I definitely have a mix of grades in every set I own.  I don't see this as a bad thing at all.  Looking at the registries, many other collectors also mix grades.  I am not planning on changing my strategy at all, but wanted to get the groups thoughts on what I consider to be "extreme set matching".  

Thoughts?

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When I noticed that I had a couple of Ben Franklin MS64 FBL, I decided to get the set. All MS64 FBL, I have just two more to go, 1948-1963. I know JP does MS Full Steps too. I probably won’t make a habit of similar sets, because I enjoy variety, including Canadian, British, Mexican and other countries coins as well.

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On 7/2/2022 at 11:09 AM, Mr.Bill347 said:

When I noticed that I had a couple of Ben Franklin MS64 FBL, I decided to get the set. All MS64 FBL, I have just two more to go, 1948-1963. I know JP does MS Full Steps too. I probably won’t make a habit of similar sets, because I enjoy variety, including Canadian, British, Mexican and other countries coins as well.

okay... This is the same as my fiend.  If you saw an attractive 65FBL that was the same price (or even $5 higher), would you pass it over and wait for the MS64FBL?  What about a 63FBL that was 50% less than the 64 and looked the same side by side with your 64s?

Are there certain sets where grade matching is more/less important?  In collecting half cents, grade matching is almost impossible unless you have very deep pockets, or you want to buy low grade coins.  But even in my more modern pursuits, I would buy a higher grade (that looks the part) if the price were comparable.  I also buy lower graded coins that I think are under graded or more attractive than its higher graded counterpart. 

I also know that some build the same set it multiple grades - i.e. The same set in 64, 65, and 67.  I would never even attempt this, because I know I would fail and I might go crazy trying.

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On 7/2/2022 at 4:18 PM, zadok said:

...strictly depends on the collectors goal for his/her collection...if goes to the absolute extreme it becomes an OCD issue n the collection is the least of the owners worries...there r a few very basic questions one needs to ask ones self...for whom is the set being assembled for n who is going to look at it??...if the set is being assembled with intent to competitively display it, then uniformity comes into play...i once displayed one of my collections at the ANA, n i decided on a narrow but reasonable grade range, vf35-xf45, the set had an eyepleasing uniform appearance n received many positive comments, i did pass on several vf25 n au50 coins for presentation purposes but also did purchase many of those same coins for inclusion in the set for my post display purposes...if ur set is for ur eyes only, just go with what satisfies u....

“Yeah, Charlie Babbit made a joke, yeah.”

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On 7/2/2022 at 11:27 AM, The Neophyte Numismatist said:

....If you saw an attractive 65FBL that was the same price (or even $5 higher), would you pass it over and wait for the MS64FBL?  

I don't have the luxury of time.  I would simply resubmit the MS-65 FBL, state that it is clearly overgraded and pay handsomely for the privilege of reconsideration with a view toward downgrading it to an MS-64 FBL.  Problem solved.  :whistle:

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On 7/6/2022 at 11:35 PM, Quintus Arrius said:

I don't have the luxury of time.  I would simply resubmit the MS-65 FBL, state that it is clearly overgraded and pay handsomely for the privilege of reconsideration with a view toward downgrading it to an MS-64 FBL.  Problem solved.  :whistle:

On those it would be much cheaper to just buy a lesser grade than resubmit them. 

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On 7/6/2022 at 11:35 PM, Quintus Arrius said:

I don't have the luxury of time.  I would simply resubmit the MS-65 FBL, state that it is clearly overgraded and pay handsomely for the privilege of reconsideration with a view toward downgrading it to an MS-64 FBL.  Problem solved.  :whistle:

now - there is an idea :kidaround:

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Posted (edited)

For the record, last I checked, there is only one reason why I cannot complete a matched set of my 66 line: only two coins [of the eight original 🐓 's] have been certified by NGC.

Edited by Quintus Arrius
Die.polishing: resolve verb/tense discord.
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On 7/7/2022 at 7:25 PM, Hoghead515 said:

On those it would be much cheaper to just buy a lesser grade than resubmit them. 

I've been mulling over your reply and wondered why I would think otherwise. The answer for me was in your first two words: "On those..."  Right you are!  I know nothing about Franklin Halves or what they go for today.  In my Rooster-centric view, e.g., a prominent dealer in California had a sell price of $795. for an 1899 NGC-graded MS-62, of which only 6 have been certified. And that is at the lower end of the Mint State scale. Therefore, in my mind, reconsideration-- meant clearly as a joke-- would be a whole lot less cheaper than outright buying, up or down. 

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On 7/7/2022 at 9:35 PM, Quintus Arrius said:

I've been mulling over your reply and wondered why I would think otherwise. The answer for me was in your first two words: "On those..."  Right you are!  I know nothing about Franklin Halves or what they go for today.  In my Rooster-centric view, e.g., a prominent dealer in California had a sell price of $795. for an 1899 NGC-graded MS-62, of which only 6 have been certified. And that is at the lower end of the Mint State scale. Therefore, in my mind, reconsideration-- meant clearly as a joke-- would be a whole lot less cheaper than outright buying, up or down. 

I never thought about it till after I posted. I later thought you may have been being sarcastic. Anyway on those most dates in MS 64 can be bought between $20 to $40. And all around that range. Some a little higher. 

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