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Week #10 - Timing is everything...

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In what year did the United States large cent first become a legal tender?

 

First post that correctly answers the above question wins "The Complete Guide to Buffalo Nickels, Second Edition" written by David W. Lange.

 

Don't forget, we also draw for a runner-up prize from all remaining posts with a correct answer.

 

Good Luck!

 

 

REMINDER: The Numisma-Quest ends/ended on Saturday at midnight EST. Entries after that time will not be valid. See the Trivia Info post for more details.

 

 

When you post your answer, only the administrators can see it. Stop back each Monday. We will make all the posts visible and announce the winners.

 

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1793? Can it be? Seems to easy. I gotta be missing something........ hmmmmmmmmmm..... maybe I'll figure it out later. For now my guess is 1793. smile.gif

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  • Administrator

The question:

In what year did the United States large cent first become a legal tender?

 

The answer:

It was never a legal tender until the Mint Act of 1965 made all previously issued USA coins legal tender.

 

The winner is gmarguli!

Your prize is "The Complete Guide to Buffalo Nickels, Second Edition" written by David W. Lange.

 

 

The winner of the runner up prize this week is.....tjennings!

 

Your prize is an Intercept Shield Double Protection Box (holds 10 graded coins).

 

 

Prizes will be sent out ASAP.

 

Thanks to all. smile.gif

 

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Dena,

 

This was an excellent question. I was furious with myself for not finding the correct Mint Act. (I did know that the copper issues weren't legal tender initially.) I like this level of difficulty, even though I've yet to win.

 

BTW, do these questions have to be about US Federal issues? I won't do any better, but I'm ok if you expanded to any sector of numismatics.

 

EVP

 

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-approved May 12, 1933, is amended to read as follows: "All coins and currencies of the United States (including Federal Reserve notes and circulating notes of Federal Reserve banks and national banking associations) heretofore or hereafter coined or issued, shall be legal tender for all debts, public and private, public charges, taxes, duties, and dues, except that gold coins, when below the standard weight and limit of tolerance provided by law for the single piece, shall be legal tender only at valuation in proportion to their actual weight.' [294 U.S. 240, 293]  http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/scripts/getcase.pl?navby=case&court=us&vol=294&invol=240The prize is not at all important to me as much as the correct answer is.

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I posted this or thought I did after my initial post.

 

The half cent restrike of 1811 and the large cent restrikes of 1823 and "1804" come from this batch. They deceived few collectors but turned a profit anyway. The latter (1804) was an alteration of an 1803 cent die, since collectors recognize that 1803 cents are common but 1804 cents are not. Most of these dies were bought back by the Treasury Department in 1878. A hundred years later the 1823 dies were still out there someplace. The legal tender act of 1933 granted legal tender status to half cents and large cents, so the use today of those dies would be counterfeiting.

 

Is this information incorrect?

 

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Timing is everything...

 

I guess not. laugh.gif I waited and waited and waited for the question and it never came. I assumed Dena had gone home. Maybe she just waited until I logged off? Naaahh, NGC doesn't hate me like PCGS does.

 

 

The winner is gmarguli!

 

I think I am the first TWO TIME WINNER!!!!! Bow Your Heads to the Numismatic Trivia God!!! wink.gif

 

 

Your prize is "The Complete Guide to Buffalo Nickels, Second Edition" written by David W. Lange.

 

Sounds like a great prize. I'm looking forward to it!

 

 

The winner of the runner up prize this week is.....tjennings!

 

Even though TJ was the only other person with the correct answer, knowing his luck I'd still have thought he'd have lost the runner-up drawing. wink.gif

 

 

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Wow! You learn something new everyday at this board. I was certain that the Coinage Act of 1965 was the first to grant legal tender status to the old coppers, but it looks like Capped Bust Collector found an earlier legalization.

 

The quoted section is taken from the Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1933, which also gave us two more years of Peace Dollar coinage after that series had run out of bullion. It seems that Congress was in such a hurry to settle the gold issue that it didn't pay attention to the nation's coinage history, inadvertently legalizing coppers in the process.

 

I would say we have two winners . . . Dena?

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Absolutely! CappedBust will also receive a copy of "The Complete Guide to Buffalo Nickels, Second Edition" written by David W. Lange.

 

Thanks for setting us straight.

 

 

Uh-oh...does this mean that Greg is not technically the Numismatic Trivia God?!?!?!

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