Trusting the Grading Companies ???
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Hello all, although I know the forum's thoughts on grading but I thought this was interesting. I sent 12 coins (4 of each mint mark) to one of the 2 leading grading companies. They sent back coins with labels for 8 Philadelphia and 4 Denver but there was actually 4 San Frans that they labeled "P". How can I trust the grade when they see a P instead of a S on a coin LOL 

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In the fine print it might say, "Always include a pair of reading glasses with every order."

These simple errors are the most frustrating because they should not occur.

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If true, a "mechanical error" on the label is no big deal as, if this happened at NGC, they will send you a shipping label to return the coins and fix the labels at no charge. I agree it is frustrating when it happens but there is a solution. Not sure what PCGS or ANACS policy is but I imagine it is very similar or the same. 

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Why don't you let the market -- us -- decide?  It'll give me a legitimate chance to use my expressly forbidden 30-power loupe and at least one other member an excuse to break out his heavy artillery.

We will let you know if it's an S or a P as they claim. If you want a fair, unbiased opinion, consult your bosom buddies right here first. [And may I suggest posting pictures with your running commentary.]  🐓 

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   Errors by grading services--obvious and otherwise-- aren't as rare as they should be and lead to an important lesson: Learn about coins you wish to collect, carefully inspect them, and rely ultimately on your own informed judgment, not that of grading services, dealers, or other third parties.

   I knowingly purchased from a dealer's "cheap slab" box a low grade 1873-S with arrows Seated dime that NGC had certified as the Philadelphia issue to demonstrate that grading services are fallible.  You can see the "S" mint mark on NGC's photos (#2028915-007) as well as on mine in the "Sandon's Certified Seated Dimes" registry set (#21 under the 1837-91 circulation issue, 1873 Arrows slot).  Even if the error originated with the submitter, it should have been caught by the graders.

   More serious errors are ones that require more than the relatively casual, low magnification inspection of certain coins by graders.  Attached are my photos of an 1867 Seated dime that PCGS designated "PF 62" (#06993924).  Although certified as a proof, I believe that this coin is actually a more valuable circulation strike.  It exhibits the obverse clash marks and other characteristics of Fortin's variety F-102 (Greer 103).  Both Fortin and Greer regard coins from these dies to be circulation strikes.  It is often difficult and controversial to distinguish some nineteenth century circulation strikes from proofs, and I question whether the determination of grading services should be determinative on this issue.

1867 dime obv..jpg

1867 dime rev..jpg

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On 7/6/2022 at 9:23 PM, ldhall said:

but what does "Quality Check" really mean

You’ve uncovered THE problem of this generation of workers. 

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On 7/6/2022 at 5:50 PM, ldhall said:

.... How can I trust the grade when they see a P instead of a S on a coin LOL 

Deleted.

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