Disme
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12 posts in this topic

On 12/13/2021 at 9:11 AM, Stackerdude21 said:

Are you saying it’s French for Dime?

Forced me to look this one up, learning something new everyday. It does appear to be where the word Dime originated. Very interesting.  Here's a copy and pasted quote from a website I just pulled up. (Maybe this is also where the criminal slang term, "Hey man.... you DIMED me out...." originated as well.) 😁

St. Dismas is the patron saint of all those in prison. 

It was titled Disme, The Arts of Tenths or Decimal Arithmetike and it was this translation which inspired Thomas Jefferson to propose a decimal currency for the United States (note that one tenth of a dollar is still called a dime).

Edited by GBrad
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Seems “You Dimed me out” would be an after effect of the saying: “Drop a dime on someone” as in calling the cops. Same as “Ratting” on someone.

I am learning a lot about history in this coin collecting hobby, or is it an “obsession?” 
Does “I need that coin” ever end?

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If you're interested in a deeper dive into the French aspect, I am pretty sure that it would have a circumflex: dîme. Often the "hat"--properly called the accent circonflexe in French--represents the loss of an S that became increasingly silent over time. A good illustration would be their word for "hospital," which is hôpital.

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"Disme" was commonplace in English until about 1810 when younger writers began using "dime." Disme continues in US Mint correspondence of older people until about 1875 when it vanishes completely. In English it is was pronounced "dym" regardless of spelling. (There are couple of draft letters by Mint Director Moore using "disme" where the final clerk's copy uses "dime.")

Edited by RWB
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On 12/13/2021 at 8:07 AM, JKK said:

If you're interested in a deeper dive into the French aspect, I am pretty sure that it would have a circumflex: dîme. Often the "hat"--properly called the accent circonflexe in French--represents the loss of an S that became increasingly silent over time. A good illustration would be their word for "hospital," which is hôpital.

 

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