Struck through nickel
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8 posts in this topic

Not sure what caused this. I believe it was a ton of grease on the dies and the holes happened after it left the mint. Unless someone seen a strike through like this and can tell me what it may of been that caused it. I’ve seen strike throughs with imprints of cloth from rags they used to wipe of the dies, staples and springs from the machinery but I’m not sure about this one.

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On 11/24/2021 at 1:07 AM, Woods020 said:

I believe the culprit is exposure to high heat at some point in its life. I’m fairly confident it didn’t happen during the minting process, so it’s damage. The cause of the damage is guess on my part. 

I agree 100% with Woods, this is damage after it left the mint.  There are a host of things that could have caused the 'rippling' effect on the reverse you are seeing.  It could be from heat damage (most likely), it could be acid damage, or it could even have been place in a very powerful vibratory/ultra sonic cleaning machine which I have actually experimented with and have see comparable results.  It did not leave the mint this way for sure.  Nickel dies do quickly deteriorate faster simply due to the extra hardness of the Nickel planchet metal/material itself as opposed to a softer metal such as a copper Cent. This would not be anything that occurred during the striking event.   

Edited by GBrad
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On 11/24/2021 at 2:41 AM, GBrad said:

I agree 100% with Woods, this is damage after it left the mint.  There are a host of things that could have caused the 'rippling' effect on the reverse you are seeing.  It could be from heat damage (most likely), it could be acid damage, or it could even have been place in a very powerful vibratory/ultra sonic cleaning machine which I have actually experimented with and have see comparable results.  It did not leave the mint this way for sure.  Nickel dies do quickly deteriorate faster simply due to the extra hardness of the Nickel planchet metal/material itself as opposed to a softer metal such as a copper Cent. This would not be anything that occurred during the striking event.   

Wouldn’t high heat tarnish the nickel? Acid I believe would eat at it and take layers off not melt it to ripple. The ultra sonic vibration sounds a little more plausible and interesting to try. Ok thanks for the input. I’m just posting another pick that I thank acid did the damage. Not sure if it was acid that caused this but if I believed anything did then this is my guess on what it would look like.

5045F68C-306B-471A-8C7A-9C2BF282CB3B.jpeg

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On 11/24/2021 at 6:27 PM, Keith Dee said:

Wouldn’t high heat tarnish the nickel? Acid I believe would eat at it and take layers off not melt it to ripple. The ultra sonic vibration sounds a little more plausible and interesting to try. Ok thanks for the input. I’m just posting another pick that I thank acid did the damage. Not sure if it was acid that caused this but if I believed anything did then this is my guess on what it would look like.

5045F68C-306B-471A-8C7A-9C2BF282CB3B.jpeg

Heat can cause discoloration, but that also can come off fairly easily. I say heat mainly because of the splatter craters in it as I call them. I’ve seen many coins that someone put a welder to and you see those same craters. 
 

This second nickel is surely environmental damage. It doesn’t look like acid exposure to me, but who knows. Almost looks like it was stored in or with something with rust. But trying to guess chemical reactions on coins is often a fools errand….atleast for this fool 

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On 11/24/2021 at 10:32 PM, Woods020 said:

Heat can cause discoloration, but that also can come off fairly easily. I say heat mainly because of the splatter craters in it as I call them. I’ve seen many coins that someone put a welder to and you see those same craters. 
 

This second nickel is surely environmental damage. It doesn’t look like acid exposure to me, but who knows. Almost looks like it was stored in or with something with rust. But trying to guess chemical reactions on coins is often a fools errand….atleast for this fool 

I'm with Woods on all counts with these nickels.  Both are damaged in some way.

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On 11/24/2021 at 7:27 PM, Keith Dee said:

Wouldn’t high heat tarnish the nickel? Acid I believe would eat at it and take layers off not melt it to ripple. The ultra sonic vibration sounds a little more plausible and interesting to try. Ok thanks for the input. I’m just posting another pick that I thank acid did the damage. Not sure if it was acid that caused this but if I believed anything did then this is my guess on what it would look like.

5045F68C-306B-471A-8C7A-9C2BF282CB3B.jpeg

Dip this one, or let it soak for a few minutes, in pure acetone and see what happens.  It may very well remove whatever is on this coin (if it is on the surface).

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