1924 Mercury Dime DDO?!?!
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12 posts in this topic

  • Member: Seasoned Veteran

That's an extreme example of strike doubling, aka machine or mechanical doubling. This is very common on the obverses of Mercury Dimes. For that coin type the obverse die was in the lower, or "anvil" position, and it led to frequent shearing action during the striking of the coin and withdrawal of the dies afterward.

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On 8/7/2021 at 10:31 AM, DWLange said:

That's an extreme example of strike doubling, aka machine or mechanical doubling. This is very common on the obverses of Mercury Dimes. For that coin type the obverse die was in the lower, or "anvil" position, and it led to frequent shearing action during the striking of the coin and withdrawal of the dies afterward.

But it has its own corners in some parts are you positive it is not a double die?

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In every photo the strike doubling is at a lower relief than the main lettering/numerals, that is an almost infallible telltale of strike doubling.  See the photo I have attached, it demonstrates the shearing effect that Mr. Lange described. 

MD VS DD.jpg

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On 8/9/2021 at 10:54 AM, Just Bob said:

That is a well done presentation. (thumbsu   https://www.ngccoin.com/pdf/US_Coin_Die_Varieties.pdf

I second that Just Bob!! Very well done presentation not doubt whomever wrote it.  Just got done reading the entire thing, very pleasant and an easy enjoyable read.  Extremely informative to any newcomer to this great hobby and a must read article for anyone new that is truly willing to to put in the time, effort and energy to go "outside the box" in solely relying on others to answer your questions (and don't stop here on this one article in your education). BUT....by no means am I saying we aren't here for you, and to help you out, we DEFINITELY are!  We really enjoy good, valid, and worthwhile questions and conversations from those members willing to learn from the knowledgeable folks and friends here on this great NGC forum. (P.S.- arguing with expert opinions and professional numismatists is... uh.... not good... Just FYI.)(thumbsu. Here's a pic of what Mr. DW Lange was referring to in his comment on this thread. Good stuff!! Take Care!

 

IMG_1615.jpg

Edited by GBrad
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On 8/7/2021 at 4:51 PM, Coinbuf said:

In every photo the strike doubling is at a lower relief than the main lettering/numerals, that is an almost infallible telltale of strike doubling.  See the photo I have attached, it demonstrates the shearing effect that Mr. Lange described. 

MD VS DD.jpg

In this same order of ideas, I took this photo almost accidentally after many unsuccessful attempts, (due to not having the proper tools) this photo belongs to a 1966 penny p it is the E for cent, this is a total and absolutely normal E ?

20210817_20210817_165756.jpg

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On 8/21/2021 at 8:22 AM, Elviscocho said:

In this same order of ideas, I took this photo almost accidentally after many unsuccessful attempts, (due to not having the proper tools) this photo belongs to a 1966 penny p it is the E for cent, this is a total and absolutely normal E ?

 

Welcome to the forum, I'm sorry but your photo is out of focus and I cannot tell anything from the photo you have posted.   Also you need to start with a photo of the whole coin (cropped and in focus) both obv and rev, describe what you are seeing and then provide a close up (in focus) of that area.   Also you need to back off the magnification, as I always say everything looks like something at the micron level.   Closeups do not need to be this close to see what is going on, in fact magnification this high usually distorts what is actually there and promotes pareidolia.

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On 8/21/2021 at 11:22 AM, Elviscocho said:

In this same order of ideas, I took this photo almost accidentally after many unsuccessful attempts, (due to not having the proper tools) this photo belongs to a 1966 penny p it is the E for cent, this is a total and absolutely normal E ?

20210817_20210817_165756.jpg

Sorry, but those are not split serifs.

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