Counterfeit Bust Half - Gold Standard Auctions
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10 posts in this topic

I recently on a whim bid on a few coins from an auction by gold standard auctions. The pictures were horrible and I knew better, but I rolled the dice. 2 of the 3 are just as described surprisingly. One, an 1834 bust half, is counterfeit. As soon as I saw it I knew it was trouble. I weighed it and it’s a gram light so not horrible, but it doesn’t register as silver on my sigma metalytics. Also the look is just off. 
 

I called them now and get this it has to be deemed a counterfeit by a TPG. They will not accept anything else other than that for a return. I even asked so if I send it to NGC and spend $60 on grading and shipping you will reimburse me for that just for them to tell you it’s counterfeit? And they said they will. I guess I’m stuck getting it body bagged and hoping they do what they said and then reimburse me. 

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It sounds like you have nothing to lose except time if they stick to their word.

Could you post pictures of both sides so that we can take a look?

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Yes pictures could be important to determine if it is a modern fake or a contemporary one.  The contemporaries can be more valuable than the real ones.

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Sorry for some reason I didn’t see responses to this. The first two are the coin in hand. The bottom two are the listing pictures, which I will agree are stupid to buy from. I thought I would roll the dice on one coin from them to see if their descriptions were accurate. Not so much….

34A156E9-9412-4077-9762-FB2DDEE348E6.jpeg

178E9242-5A98-4671-85B9-5F5CB9887479.jpeg

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I think that on might be a good quality contemporary counterfeit.  I don't have my copy of Davignon available (and it's the first edition not the updated second edition) or I'd try and see if it is listed.  Found an online version of  Davignon, looks like it might be a D 9-I.  What is the weight?  The D 9-I is plated copper.  If it is a 9-I it is in much nicer condition than the plate coin in the book.

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Here is the description of 9-I in Davignon, 2nd edition:

Cast copy of O-111?

I centered below right side of E  (That has to be a typo - the I is under the right side of the "T")

Les - Below stand of D

Res - Between A and M (near M)

Obv.    Star 7 points to junction of curl and headband. Date is low.

Rev.     C. in 50C is mostly below olive stem.

Copper. Very scarce

 

 

Conder101 is correct  about the look of your piece. It shows much less wear than the one in the book. 

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Posted (edited)

Weight is 12.72 grams. Diameter seems correct (32.54). 
 

In hand it could definitely be coated copper. Areas of wear show copper tones starting to show. 

Edited by Woods020
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Weight seems high for coated copper unless the coin is thicker than normal.  At standard thickness a copper piece should weigh about 11.54 grams.  It would need to be about 10% thicker.  But that would only be about .2 mm or .008 inches.

 

And that position of the I under the right side of E is a typo.  The site I was looking at Davignon on did have a list of errors in the book and that typo was identified as such.

Edited by Conder101
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Thanks for all the info. I was unaware of the book of attributed counterfeits. Definitely learned something. I just hate that I have to send it in for body bagging. I don’t want to waste their money, and will be livid if they don’t reimburse me afterwards. 

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