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Coins like this one really help to keep me in the game. posted by Walkerfan

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  • Member: Seasoned Veteran

I really LIKE fresh material, too.

 

And I was drawn to this one like a moth to the flame.

 

Fresh to the market and in an older NGC #7 slab that's in perfect condition. This coin is 99% bright white with just a very light skin. The strike is freakishly sharp on both the obverse and reverse, even considering the fact that the 1934 P is, generally, a rather well produced issue. The fields are virtually pristine. Luster looks pretty decent, as well. This one looks so much better than the MS 67s that I've seen.

 

I'll bet that John Albanese has never even seen this coin, as I'm sure that it would have stickered, if he had. I'm glad that it had no sticker affixed to it, when I purchased it, though, so as not to artificially drive the price up. I got it for well below retail and a little below wholesale. As much as I respect JA and CAC; I don't really care what CAC thinks about my coins. Sure, it's wonderful to have his blessing and he offers a great service for certain coins that are questionable and it makes such coins much more marketable when selling. But Walkerfan gives it HIS OWN GOLD STICKER, for sure, and that's all that really matters to me. ;) Learn your series and you will be able to recognize important buying opportunities and make your own empowered buying decisions. The bottom line is that there are still some nice coins out there but they are being mined, at a very rapid pace, which drives me to act, whenever I do happen to see them.

 

This coin brings me up to the number 11 ranking on the NGC Registry for the Walker Full 65 coin set. The #11 spot had previously been held by a long time phantom set, as I know for a fact that many of the coins in that set were sold years ago. This one will be re-graded for sure one day. But until then, it will rest comfortably in my set, and even after that for many years to come. It also matches the quality of my 1936 P coin quite well and, also, my 1935 P & 1937 P coins, for that matter.

 

I was told once by a veteran collector to make an effort to pick up the Walker coins of the 1930s, as they are quite difficult and are only getting tougher to find and I agree with that advice, as it's very true. The branch minted coins of the 1930s (Denver and San Francisco) are more desirable and also scarcer but Philly coins, such as this one, are simply NOT that easy to locate, especially at a decent price. Just do an eBay search and you'll see all the high prices yet the lack of any type of good quality. The 1934 Philly Walker is the #1 toughest Philly coin to find from 1934-1947, in MS 65 and higher grades, and second only to the 1938 Philly coin in OVERALL MS rarity. The 1935 P is likely number three.

 

It's really funny, as 15-20 years ago; I wouldn't have even considered paying this much for a 1934 Philly coin in this grade. This is what I would have paid for a choice or near gem 1934-S coin. Ha Ha! But those days are long GONE, my friends. I didn't even have to think about going after this coin. I happily purchased it and without hesitation. As Mike Wolfe from 'American Pickers' always says: "The time to buy it is when you see it." ;)

 

Again, a lot of pleasure and potential reward for very little monetary outlay. These coins were selling for just under $1100 ten years ago. It will be interesting to see what impact, if any, the U.S. Mint's release of the Centennial Gold Walker coin will have on the traditional Walker series market. I believe that these coins are going to rise in the future and, if the laws of economic forecasting are correct, the next peak cycle will eclipse the previous high price levels.

 

I wish all of you the best of luck and success in all of your collecting endeavors!

 

WF

17467.jpg

 

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That one is spectacular--very clean of ticks and rubs in the usual places and well struck in the common softer areas.

I don't know what it takes for the grading services to give a Walker a 68. Surely they do not follow the "by the book" grading criteria. It seems as if Walker's start at 67 for near perfect and on a super-rare occasion get a point bump from exceptional eye appeal only.

Congrats on a great addition.

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The slab may say 66, but it looks as good as or better than my 67. Surfaces are just as clean, and a better strike.

 

Congratulations - going to try for a re-grade?

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The slab may say 66, but it looks as good as or better than my 67. Surfaces are just as clean, and a better strike.

 

Congratulations - going to try for a re-grade?

 

Thanks. It looked under-graded to me, too.

 

Yes, I have several Walkers that I'd like to have re-graded.

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The slab may say 66, but it looks as good as or better than my 67. Surfaces are just as clean, and a better strike.

 

Congratulations - going to try for a re-grade?

 

Thanks. It looked under-graded to me, too.

 

Yes, I have several Walkers that I'd like to have re-graded.

to have some regraded for the better sure makes it all the more better as well. best wishes
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The slab may say 66, but it looks as good as or better than my 67. Surfaces are just as clean, and a better strike.

 

Congratulations - going to try for a re-grade?

 

I was thinking in the same way as I looked at that beauty!! Could it be that the MS66 reflects the reverse die breaking under pressure over wear? It still looks great!!

 

What a strike. (thumbs u

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Could it be that the MS66 reflects the reverse die breaking under pressure over wear? It still looks great!!

 

What a strike. (thumbs u

 

Hi Rick, a tiny die crack like that should not limit the grade much.

 

Glad you like it! :)

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