Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

The Journey Continues... posted by danny0603

9 posts in this topic

  • Member: Seasoned Veteran

ADVICE PLEASE

 

I am getting ready to send in my first US coins (19th century type set) for grading.

 

I have many rolls of what appear to be uncirculated coins all of the same date that were my fathers. Pictured below are a few of these examples. (1956P Washington Quarter, 1956 Dimes, 1958D Dimes). Most of these rolls are from the 50s with the exception of a roll of 1964 halves.

 

My question is this: What would be the best way to handle these? Have the rolls certified (and what does that mean)? Have each coin certified? My dilemma is that there is such a huge difference in price between the grades. I would hate to pay $15.00 to have a $9.00 coin graded but I may be missing a higher grade worth several hundred dollars.

 

I believe my father each year went to the bank to buy a roll as soon as the new coins came out and then he put them away.

 

Thanks in advance for your suggestions.

17317.jpeg

 

See more journals by danny0603

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The rolls of coins from the 50's are not worth submitting as rolls. Check out the recent posts from Six Mile Rick on how many coins he looked at before he chose a batch to submit for grading. Even at MS66 coins from the 50s in general are only 20 to 40 dollar coins. There are some exceptions of course- a 1955 D Washington Quarter in MS66 is 100 dollars plus in MS66. But a MS65 of the same date is around 20 dollars- a break even on the grading fees. If you feel there are some nice coins that could grade MS66 or MS67 in these rolls then maybe pull out 3 to 5 of the best ones. Really though you would want to have looked closely at coins already graded MS66 or 67 to help you get an idea of what might make the grade. On other hand you could have a whole roll of MS63 or MS64 coins- nothing good in the whole roll! Also learning what makes a full torch dime or a full steps nickel may help you in your decision as to what to send in for grading. Also look at the pop reports on the NGC website- check out price guides like Numismedia to find out what dates/MM may bring more money in higher grades. Even a MS66 1956 quarter is still only a 20 dollar coin! Good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldn't submit all or most of the 1950's dated or near it coins either, unless I participated in a registry set which I do not.

 

Financially, if the OP has any in 66 or 67, I would select the highest valued and sell them if they come back in the expected grade(s). Given the current value,. it is highly likely the combined population counts in both NGC and PCGS represent a low to miniscule proportion of the actual supply.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ADVICE PLEASE

 

I am getting ready to send in my first US coins (19th century type set) for grading.

 

I have many rolls of what appear to be uncirculated coins all of the same date that were my fathers. Pictured below are a few of these examples. (1956P Washington Quarter, 1956 Dimes, 1958D Dimes). Most of these rolls are from the 50s with the exception of a roll of 1964 halves.

 

My question is this: What would be the best way to handle these? Have the rolls certified (and what does that mean)? Have each coin certified? My dilemma is that there is such a huge difference in price between the grades. I would hate to pay $15.00 to have a $9.00 coin graded but I may be missing a higher grade worth several hundred dollars.

 

I believe my father each year went to the bank to buy a roll as soon as the new coins came out and then he put them away.

 

Thanks in advance for your suggestions.

17317.jpeg

 

See more journals by danny0603

find an expert in modern coinage and have him/her pre-screen the rolls for you, that way you have a pretty sure bet of not wasting your money on the ones that you do send in...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The rolls of coins from the 50's are not worth submitting as rolls. Check out the recent posts from Six Mile Rick on how many coins he looked at before he chose a batch to submit for grading. Even at MS66 coins from the 50s in general are only 20 to 40 dollar coins. There are some exceptions of course- a 1955 D Washington Quarter in MS66 is 100 dollars plus in MS66. But a MS65 of the same date is around 20 dollars- a break even on the grading fees. If you feel there are some nice coins that could grade MS66 or MS67 in these rolls then maybe pull out 3 to 5 of the best ones. Really though you would want to have looked closely at coins already graded MS66 or 67 to help you get an idea of what might make the grade. On other hand you could have a whole roll of MS63 or MS64 coins- nothing good in the whole roll! Also learning what makes a full torch dime or a full steps nickel may help you in your decision as to what to send in for grading. Also look at the pop reports on the NGC website- check out price guides like Numismedia to find out what dates/MM may bring more money in higher grades. Even a MS66 1956 quarter is still only a 20 dollar coin! Good luck!

 

+1 --- I like this post Yankee :grin:

Link to comment
Share on other sites