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1943 Copper Penny-Where to sell?

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Hello, I am new to the board and have a question. I have a 1943 Copper Penny that my grandparents came across when they were young. I have done my research into this coin and can say that this is an authentic 1943 Copper Penny- There is one downfall to the coin, my granddad in disbelief took a knife to see the hardness of the coin and cut a fine line into it. Being it copper, the knife was able to cut into it. My question is, how much does this hurt the value and to whom would I sell it? Thanks

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You absolutely need to send it in and get it certified as "genuine" or "details" by PCGS or NGC respectively. Because of the damage, it is very likely that neither PCGS nor NGC will consider it "gradeable" (I say that as a virtual conclusion), but it is imperative that the coin be certified genuine, or it will be unsellable. There are thousands and thousands of counterfeits of these coins out there, in the midst of a grand total of about 20 genuine examples from all three mints.

 

Because it is so rare, the coin still has considerable value even damaged as it is, but the damage sounds very severe, and would substantially devalue the coin.

 

The coin, if determined to be genuine, and depending on the level of preservation and the severity of the cut, has a market value of anywhere between $10,000-$50,000. In my opinion, the best place to sell a genuine example would be Heritage. Your coin, if genuine, would generate a considerable amount of publicity.

 

Good luck. Post pics.

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Everything RMA said is true. I am highly doubtful, however, that you have a genuine example - they are exceedingly rare. Good luck, and I hope this works out well for you!

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Thank you very much for your advice. I will look into it.

While you're at that would it be too much trouble to show it to us? Basically all you've been "advised" is there are authenticity issues on these and if something's damaged it's probably worth less. You're moving too fast if you're assuming it's authentic. Make sure it's authentic, first; ask what it's worth, second.

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Until your coin is authenticated by one of the major grading services or a recognized expert, it's considered to be worthless by almost everyone in the coin collecting community. Also, cutting or scratching a coin greatly diminishes it's value.

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Until your coin is authenticated by one of the major grading services or a recognized expert, it's considered to be worthless by almost everyone in the coin collecting community. Also, cutting or scratching a coin greatly diminishes it's value.

 

Not totally worthless... As it still has One Cent face value! ;)

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Not totally worthless... As it still has One Cent face value! ;)

 

And if it's really copper (altered date) it's worth 2-3 times face!

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Without a picture and a weight, we would have to be highly skeptical of the coin. I take it it doesn't stick to a magnet?

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If it doesn't stick to a magnet then it's not a copper plated 1943 steel cent fake - but it might be an altered date. Check the 3. If it looks like half an 8, it is a fake. The 3 should have a long tail (like the 9). Even if the 3 does have a long tail, it could still be a fake, just a better one. Pictures would definitely help.

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More than likely, it was this coin that triggered my interest in coins. In the mid 70's I read an ad or short article about the 1943 copper penny. It mentioned that 5 have been discovered, and said if you found one, it would be worth $10,000 Seems I was making about 25 cents per hour plus room and board, I was fascinated with the thought of finding one. As a habit, I checked my change for many years looking for one.

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Bad news...found the penny and tried placing a magnet on it...and it stuck. Sorry to get everyone's hopes up. Is there something rare about a 1909 cent coin with three letters on it? My grandma said it was a rare coin. Anyone know anything about it?

 

Only if the coin is also an S mint. The VDB is quite common from the Philly mint.

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And the "S" that Relic is speaking of is the mint mark, just below the date. Either one of the varieties would be a nice find, especially the 09-S VDB.

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first off welcome to the boards (thumbs u

 

and since you are sure it is a genuine original copper cent 1943 you need to send the coin to ngc to get put into their sonically sealed holders as genuine with a details grade

 

then you got 10k++ in market value

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first off welcome to the boards (thumbs u

 

and since you are sure it is a genuine original copper cent 1943 you need to send the coin to ngc to get put into their sonically sealed holders as genuine with a details grade

 

then you got 10k++ in market value

Michael, it stuck to a magnet... he does realize it's not real.
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first off welcome to the boards (thumbs u

 

and since you are sure it is a genuine original copper cent 1943 you need to send the coin to ngc to get put into their sonically sealed holders as genuine with a details grade

 

then you got 10k++ in market value

 

He already said it stuck to a magnet so it's a copper plated steel cent.

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welcome to the boards

 

sorry for your dissappointment on the 1943

 

don't feel bad, for every authentic 1943 copper

there probably are at least 10,000 copper plated ones

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