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Looks like burn spots?

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Ok, My grandpa gave me a few of his silver dollars. I have a 2001 American Silver Eagle still in the packaging from Littleton Coin Co. I Notice that it looks like it's been burned? but still sealed in the packaging. The spot is no bigger then a pea and is dark blue in the middle and orange-ish around the edge of the spot and little tiny pinhead spots around it. The other 2003 American silver eagle has a little spot like this as well and again it's still sealed

 

The 1881 Morgan, 1992 American silver eagle and every coin he given me has nothing on it like that, beside toning and they wasn't sealed and was in the same spot those other 2 was.

 

I Know for a fact he kept these in the bottom of his gun cabinet. 24/7 dark, So what can this be on the Littleton coins? could the packaging be causing it?

 

I Wish my camera didn't grow legs and walked off so i could take a picture of what i was talking about.

 

 

 

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The spot that has blue and orange can simply just be toning and if small black spots are around it that can just be carbon spots. This is just a guess of course without seeing it but pics would help alot more :). If he stored it in a gun cabinet and had the cleaning supplies in the same spot, that can def make coins turn over some time especially a silver eagle as they are fine silver.

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Those are not burn spots. Those are common toning spots. If you do not like them, sell them and buy coins without them. Personally they do not bother me.

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Depending on the colors and how vivid they are, and how much of the coin they cover, the "burnt" coins might actually be worth more!! Get some pics, that would help immensely!

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Good to see you posting again Bruce.

 

I have no idea about the coins with out images, but they do sound like "toning" spots and the cellophane selected by Littleton is inert, but the gun cleaning supplies are not.

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Typically, toned spots like you describe result from a small pinhole in the holder. The air in the gun cabinet is likely to have a decent amount of sulfur in it from gunpowder. The sulfur reacts to the silver under the hole. If the coin moves around in the holder it can cause a second spot to start. Maybe the coin sat a long time to create the large spot, then was moved a bit several more times to create the smaller spots. Without seeing pictures (and maybe even with pictures) this is all speculation.

 

Check the original holder to see if you can find a pinhole.

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Ok, this is what i want to do, because frankly i think the spots are ugly. I Want to give this coin the optimal conditions to tone naturally. Whats the best ways to do this? i did quick google search, but really wasn't helpful. I Read something on toning paper? I Don't want to fake tone the coins are anything like that.

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I think those could grow to be something that someone would appreciate over time. I think that those would be considered to be natural and have the potential to be something much better over the years.

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Littleton is known for buying coins from private individuals. This almost looks like a possibly dipped coin that wasn't completely rinsed properly. This may be some old residue spotting. I've never seen one tone like this just from storage which this looks to be in an airtite. Unless it's been opened and something got on the coin.. Jmo

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Ok, this is what i want to do, because frankly i think the spots are ugly. I Want to give this coin the optimal conditions to tone naturally. Whats the best ways to do this? i did quick google search, but really wasn't helpful. I Read something on toning paper? I Don't want to fake tone the coins are anything like that.
Why not just sell it and buy one you like?
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I think those could grow to be something that someone would appreciate over time. I think that those would be considered to be natural and have the potential to be something much better over the years.
They are not going to look better, with time ;)
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Littleton is known for buying coins from private individuals. This almost looks like a possibly dipped coin that wasn't completely rinsed properly. This may be some old residue spotting. I've never seen one tone like this just from storage which this looks to be in an airtite. Unless it's been opened and something got on the coin.. Jmo

 

I'm 150% Positive it wasn't dipped, i know for a fact that this coin was spotless and was sealed in the littleton plastic for years before it started getting these spots. i stuck this coin in an airtite holder about 2 weeks ago.

 

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Ok, this is what i want to do, because frankly i think the spots are ugly. I Want to give this coin the optimal conditions to tone naturally. Whats the best ways to do this? i did quick google search, but really wasn't helpful. I Read something on toning paper? I Don't want to fake tone the coins are anything like that.
Why not just sell it and buy one you like?

 

Would you think it would worth sending it to NGC? then sell it?

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Ooooh, I think Mark has some insider information!! Care to share?
None at all. It looks like highly unappealing surface contamination in the form of stains, and I can't think of why they would get lighter and/or less unattractive, over time.
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Ok, this is what i want to do, because frankly i think the spots are ugly. I Want to give this coin the optimal conditions to tone naturally. Whats the best ways to do this? i did quick google search, but really wasn't helpful. I Read something on toning paper? I Don't want to fake tone the coins are anything like that.
Why not just sell it and buy one you like?

 

Would you think it would worth sending it to NGC? then sell it?

No, I think that would be a huge waste of money. Even if its appearance could be improved significantly (and I doubt it could) whatever postage and other fees you paid would not be offset by a higher sale price.
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I think what he means by sell it and buy one you like is sell it on eBay and you would likely get around $24-25 since it is an ounce of silver...

 

Then turn around and buy one that is nice and white for about 2 dollars more...

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I think what he means by sell it and buy one you like is sell it on eBay and you would likely get around $24-25 since it is an ounce of silver...

 

Then turn around and buy one that is nice and white for about 2 dollars more...

 

I find it strange to stress out about a bullion coin. Kinda like complaining about scratches on a circulated 1964 Washington quarter isn't it? Anyway, it is obvious the coin was exposed to some sort of pollution (perhaps a sneeze by a mint employee), but it doesn't make it more or less valuable than the silver content.

 

 

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