1489, 1492, 1838, 2017 - plus a quiz
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By strict accounting most sovereigns were gold tokens, not coins. They bore no denomination.

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Posted (edited)
On 5/11/2022 at 10:40 AM, RWB said:

By strict accounting most sovereigns were gold tokens, not coins. They bore no denomination.

Sovereigns did circulate and were used for debts and payments and depending upon the time frame, they were worth so many shillings and the like (talking about the great recoinage of 1816 timeframe - not the hammered stuff). Debasement did take its toll from time to time. Universal acceptance - maybe not at first, but as the empire grew. Legal tender with a nominal value now.

  The early sovereigns have their own history. 

 

Edited by Zebo
For clarity
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That’s an interesting observation Roger. A sovereign is a weird duck. A token in its infancy, a coin as a teen, and bullion as an adult. I’ve never really thought about it that way. Something that also has survived before, during and after the gold standard. 
 

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On 5/11/2022 at 6:14 AM, Zebo said:

 

In April, a 1492 Sovereign, King Henry VII, went to auction in Japan. NGC sent out a nice information notice about this coin.

 
 

 

What was the hammer price? Did you bid?

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On 5/15/2022 at 10:19 PM, Just Bob said:

What was the hammer price? Did you bid?

It sold for approximately $810,074 USD (with juice?) I did not bid.

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