Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

should pcgs/ngc eliminate the au53 grade?

14 posts in this topic

would it be worth it to eliminate the au 53 grade?

 

as if a coin just makes the au category then au

50 and

 

then if it is

solid a really nice au coin a 55

 

and of course a coin that is really an unc coin maybe a 62/63 but

with rub or lustre

disturbance or a coin that maybe is lusterous but had thick toning

and got an okie dip revealing a few hairlines and is not quite unc but markwise is a 63 then au 58?

 

so au 50 55 58

 

why do we need au 53? i also see the services rarely give this grade out?? or is it just ingrained in the system

it has to be left for contunity and just really never used or is not applicaple but just kept in limbo abet rarely ever

used or needed?

 

?? any comments?

 

sincerely michael

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my experience, the AU53 grade is used either as a reward for an exceptionally nice AU50 or as a penalty for a marginal AU55.

 

I don't care for the AU53 grade, and rarely see a coin in that grade that seemed appropriate to me.

 

EVP

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I really don't have a problem with AU-53, I think it breaks up the scale rather nicely. But I suppose you could make the same argument about MS-61, or MS-62, or MS-64 etc. Does that one point really make a difference? For that matter, do we really need VF-20, VF-25, VF-30 and VF-35? After all, theoretically, we could have AU-59, or AU-54, which may be where this all ends up. I am more of an old-fashioned collector, and I don't really see the need for single point breakdowns in the grading scale.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You make what many consider to be a valid point. And also one of the most common among that sector of the collecting community that does not approve of the grading companies. But if you do away with any grade - I think you have to do away a lot of them.

 

I would not be in favor of this. I think all the grades are needed to present accurate descriptions of the coins they refer to. True - many grades may not be commonly used - but what do you then do with the coins that the given grade does accurately describe ?

 

That is why Sheldon set it up the way he did. He realized at the time that the number of grades we now have came the closest to being the number actually needed to accurately describe coins. Some would even argue that we need more - but just how closely can you define something like the grade of a coin ?

 

As it stands - I think is just right.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have no problem with intermediate grades. I have a slabbed 1861 Seated Liberty dollar in AU 53. Makes me appreciate it all the more knowing that it didn't just squeek by with an AU 50.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Somebody mentioned there is a big gap between 50 & 55 and I was thinking of just the opposite; there is such a minor difference between 50 & 55 and that is why 53 is hardly ever seen. I don't see a reason to dispose of the 53, but due to the light use of the grade, it may die away on its own. 50, 55 & 58 would be fine by me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is an even larger gap between AU53/55 coins and AU58. Take a look. Often AU58 coins look like MS63/64 coins with a slight high point rub. I have several examples of this (see attachment of AU58 coin).

 

For me, there is a distinct need for all the AU grades. There are easily recognizable differences in appearance and price. The use of 2 AU grades does not provide the hobby with enough grade distinctions. This is why they added the additional 2 AU grades in the first place. tongue.gif

76857-1904SHalfEagle.jpg.951820108bbe7b62dbd31a1d88c047b6.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am more of an old-fashioned collector, and I don't really see the need for single point breakdowns in the grading scale.

 

BURN HIM!!!!!!! mad.gif

 

Actually, I think we could use fewer grades, also. We could eliminate AU-58, MS-61, and MS-62 and just call them "sliders" or "choice AU."

 

The problem is that we've come to think of grade numbers as hard science and believe they give precision. The crack out game disproves this (if the grades were exact, why do some make a business of cracking and resubmitting coins?).

 

We don't like having any ambiguity and think we can fix values to coins by applying the right grade numbers, but it really doesn't work that way, except on generic coins. If a seller has a really nice AU-53 coin, for example, he can either try to bump the grade to AU-55 or just sell it in the current slab and charge more for it. Not-so-savvy buyers will hem and haw over him selling an "AU-53" for so much and may even avoid the coin due to the low number. However, a savvy collector who recognizes the coin is better than most AU-55s will buy the coin for a premium over standard AU price and be happy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I certainly agree with that, pertaining to Liberty Double Eagles. Probably because of their size, the different AU grade Lib. Double Eagles certainly stand out. tongue.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites