Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

anyone collect foreign error coins?

8 posts in this topic

I've sold some off center ones and the prices I got were OK - maybe $20.

 

I've got one off metal coin that I picked up for a few dollars. It's french. No idea of its value.

 

The doubled dies don't seem to bring any real premium for foreign coins.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An off-metal coin is one struck not in the metal intended for it.

 

For example, some 1972 U.S. cents were struck in aluminum. That's an off-metal striking, since they're supposed to be copper or bronze or whatever...

 

(I may have gotten the date wrong, but you get the point... I'm obviously no moderns expert.)

 

EVP

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It was 1974 and they were intended to be struck in aluminum.

 

A true off metal would be something like a nickel die being used to strike coins being fed a (copper) cent planchet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, I use the definition of ``off metal'' slightly differently than you. (I can't say that I'm right though.)

 

There are a number of silver dollar pattern restrikes that were dated from the mid-1860's. They used regular Seated Dollar dies, but were struck on proper-sized planchets made not from the typical composition of silver:copper (9:1).

 

I've often referred to them as off-metal, and had no confusion. Perhaps my audience was just being polite?

 

EVP

 

PS Who knows why I referred to those patterns as restrikes?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't honestly say whether you are right or wrong. I've just always heard the term off-metal to indicate an error in the planchet.

 

Any time the planchet was intentionally different than the normal, the ones I have seen have been referred based on their metal content (i.e. Seated Dollar, J1234, struck in copper) and not off-metal (SBA, off-metal error, struck on cent planchet).

 

Maybe one of the NGC graders will see this and know the correct definition.

Link to comment
Share on other sites