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More questions about dealers at shows

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I just posted this "across the street" and would appreciate comments here, as well:

 

 

I received great feedback/information from many forum members in response to a previous question I posted here. As a result, I have been encouraged to ask some additional questions about your views of dealers at coin shows. Please feel free to comment on as many (or as few) as you like. And, I assure you, your opinions are valued. Here goes......

 

1) When viewing coins in dealers' cases, do you prefer that they be arranged in date and denominational order, or, for example, sorted by rarity, the type of holder they are in, or some other way?

 

2) Do you prefer that asking prices be noted on the front of the holders, the back of the holders, or is that unimportant?

 

3) How much does the general appearance of a company's personnel make a difference (i.e. are you more comfortable dealing with someone in a coat and tie, a Tie-dyed T-shirt, or is that unimportant to you)? Please note, the answers you provide to this question could affect me personally, in regards to what attire I might have to wear at shows. Please answer honestly but very carefully.

 

4) How important is it that a dealer's "back-up table" be clean (is it a no-no, for instance, for dealers to eat lunch at their tables?)

 

5) Are you turned-off when you see a dealer behind a table cracking open slabs?

 

6) Do you like to be able to easily pick up a dealer's newsletter/price list or at least a business card?

 

7) Is it important to you if dealers accept credit card payments?

 

8) Do you like to be "wined and dined" after the show by dealers with whom you have done sizeable deals?

 

Thanks in advance, for your replies.

 

 

 

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1) When viewing coins in dealers' cases, do you prefer that they be arranged in date and denominational order, or, for example, sorted by rarity, the type of holder they are in, or some other way?

Arranging according to denominations and dates is easiest for me.

 

2) Do you prefer that asking prices be noted on the front of the holders, the back of the holders, or is that unimportant?

I'd prefer that prices be listed, but I don't mind asking if the dealer is paying attention.

 

3) How much does the general appearance of a company's personnel make a difference (i.e. are you more comfortable dealing with someone in a coat and tie, a Tie-dyed T-shirt, or is that unimportant to you)? Please note, the answers you provide to this question could affect me personally, in regards to what attire I might have to wear at shows. Please answer honestly but very carefully.

I prefer someone to be dressed neatly, even if it's in a polo shirt and slacks. I don't think a tie is necessary, but I'd be leary of guys dressed in cut-off army fatigues and Grateful Dead T-shirts. :p

 

4) How important is it that a dealer's "back-up table" be clean (is it a no-no, for instance, for dealers to eat lunch at their tables?)

Sloppy ain't good for business. See comments on ACG dudes and their messy habits.

 

5) Are you turned-off when you see a dealer behind a table cracking open slabs?

Yep. I like to deal with those who know coins instead of those who play the crack-out game.

 

6) Do you like to be able to easily pick up a dealer's newsletter/price list or at least a business card?

Sure, if he deals in coins I'm interested in.

 

7) Is it important to you if dealers accept credit card payments?

It makes it convenient for those times I come across a coin I didn't plan on buying.

 

8) Do you like to be "wined and dined" after the show by dealers with whom you have done sizeable deals?

I've never done a deal of enough size to worry about this.

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Having just gone to a nice show this past weekend, here are my thoughts...

 

1.) I'd rather see them in date/denominational order. That's how I'm looking to fill my want list.

 

2.) I'd prefer asking prices clearly visible on front...then I know what my negotiation start point is.

 

3.) I'm not worried as much about appearance as I am attitude. If a dealer in shorts and T-shirt is cheerful, attentive, and genuinely trying to help his customers...I'd rather be with him than some guy in a nice suit and tie who is not "in the spirit".

 

4.) Doesn't bug me that much. Dealers have to eat too. If their back up table is too disorganized, though, I'd give a little thought to their business practices...

 

5.) Haven't seen it...but it would bug me. Tend to customers and do the housekeeping like that later...

 

6.) Absolutely...the successful dealers are the ones who give good customer service and then get their name out to the public.

 

7.) Very important if I'm gonna make a big ticket purchase. I don't blame the guy for not taking my check...and I'm not gonna carry that much cash around.

 

8.) I'd like it...but I'll probably never be in that position smirk.gif

 

 

Bottom line...in my opinion...even though you're busy...try to be attentive, helpful, courteous...and don't pre-judge your customer. I always dress down going to shows...but I may be the guy buying that $1000 coin from you...

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In response to your questions about dealers at shows:

 

1. I prefer to see coins arranged by denomination and date. That is how I can I.D. a dealers table to spend some time looking at, instead of scanning. I usually make a fast pass initially and go back to tables that interest me.

 

2. Listing asking prices on the coin are is unimportant. If I am interested, I will ask for pricing. Besides, it is a good way to engage a dealer.

 

3. I do not much care how they dress, as long as it is neat and clean (some dealers are real slobs).

 

4. As long as there is room for a good presentation of his wares, I do not much care if a dealer eats at the table. It is better than not being able to find anyone at the table for an hour, because I usually will not return.

 

5. I think cracking out slabs at a table is inappropriate and rude. What if a customer that you just bought the coin from walks by and sees his coins being cracked. Seeing that would be a real turn-off for me.

 

6. It is nice to be able to at least get a business card. If a dealer is a pro. he should spend $25.00 for some business cards. For one thing, if I am traveling to a different city, I usally refer to cards from dealers to visit during my trip. I only take cards from dealers that carry merchandize within my collecting interests.

 

7. I usually do not carry more than $1000 to a show, particularly if I have to walk a mile to my car after dark. It is nice if the dealer accepts credit cards or checks drawn against my brokerage account (these often are accepted).

 

8. No, I would prefer to buy my coins and move on. Having been in a Management Position for many years, I am uncomfortable having people give me gratuities worth more than a few dollars. I would rather they manage their variable overhead to give me a better price. I think that many managers feel this way.

 

Additional Comments: The thing that probably turns me off the fastest is a dealer, who for whatever reason, absolutely ignores me even though I may stand at their table for 10 minutes looking at them. You would be amazed at how often this happens. You really can not tell a person's balance sheet by their dress (look at what slobs some other dealers are!) or demeanor. If I stop, I saw something that interests me.

 

Most big shows can not be covered in a day (Saturday). Because, I do not draw money, drive some distance and pay to go to a show where possibly many, many of the out-of-town, dealers pack up and leave Sunday morning. If I wait and go to many shows on Sunday, I am often talking mostly to myself, except maybe some local dealers stay.

 

 

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Mark

answers as follows:

1. I would rather see the coins by denomination.

2. Pricing on the slab is not important. I examine the coin and then negotiate a price.

3. I don't care what you wear. Its all about the coins in your case.

4. Why should I care if your back up table is messy. If you have coins that I am looking for I will forgive the mess.

5. I can't stand watching dealers crack slabs at shows. I tend to view all their inventory as upgraded maxed out coins when I see this.

6. Yes. I think this is just good business.

7. It would be convenient but not very important.

8. The offer is a nice gesture and again a good business practice but not very important.

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1) I prefer Denominational, then date maybe with uber rare or super eye appeal sperated.

 

2) Asking price ummmm hmmmm somplace out of the way, preferable an easily removable sticker/tag

 

3) i prefer "business casual" attire. A suit is too serious, but tie dye is out. Maybe khakis and a golf shirt, or button down shirt (no tie). Basically neat, but not too stuffy

 

4) Back up table should be organized if there is product on it. Eating is ok, as long as it is away from any and all merchandise

 

5) yes, dont crack 'em where i can see ya

 

6) Newsletters and business cards are a nice touch smile.gif

 

7) credit cards are very good, I dont like to carry too much cash

 

8) no, save the money and lower your prices!

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1) When viewing coins in dealers' cases, do you prefer that they be arranged in date and denominational order, or, for example, sorted by rarity, the type of holder they are in, or some other way?

Date and denominational order is easiest for me and wastes less of my time.

 

2) Do you prefer that asking prices be noted on the front of the holders, the back of the holders, or is that unimportant?

Front - I hate asking "how much?"

 

3) How much does the general appearance of a company's personnel make a difference (i.e. are you more comfortable dealing with someone in a coat and tie, a Tie-dyed T-shirt, or is that unimportant to you)? Please note, the answers you provide to this question could affect me personally, in regards to what attire I might have to wear at shows. Please answer honestly but very carefully.

I generally dress like the casual bum I am, and it's because I hate pretenses. I think a dealer should dress to be comfortable. Usually people in suits and neckties look unpleasantly uncomfortable and they often smell bad.

 

4) How important is it that a dealer's "back-up table" be clean (is it a no-no, for instance, for dealers to eat lunch at their tables?)

Clean, yes. Anally tidy, no. Eat if you're not a pig, and don't talk with your mouth full.tongue.gif

 

5) Are you turned-off when you see a dealer behind a table cracking open slabs?

Yes. Save it for later - looks greedy.

 

6) Do you like to be able to easily pick up a dealer's newsletter/price list or at least a business card?

Yes. If I want to know who's who, I'll ask.

 

7) Is it important to you if dealers accept credit card payments?

Yes. It's my best guarantee of purchase and I don't like carrying cash.

 

8) Do you like to be "wined and dined" after the show by dealers with whom you have done sizeable deals?

Never had the option. If the dealer was a friendly person, yes, but if they were trying to woo me with business, no.

 

Thanks Mark. Hoot

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1) When viewing coins in dealers' cases, do you prefer that they be arranged in date and denominational order, or, for example, sorted by rarity, the type of holder they are in, or some other way?

 

I like them arranged by type. I want all the Buffalo nickels in one spot. All the Morgans in another. I hate having to look thru the cases at all the coins I have zero interest in just to find what I like. It increases the chances that I will miss something I may have wanted. It also increases the chances that I will skip the table if I am busy.

 

 

2) Do you prefer that asking prices be noted on the front of the holders, the back of the holders, or is that unimportant?

 

Yes and no. We all know that prices change depending on who is asking. I would like a price sticker on front just so I know that a coin may be totally out of my league without having to ask. I also hate waiting for a dealer to get done talking to his friend to quote me a price. It's a pain in the to wait several minutes to finally get a price quote and find out the dealer is on crack and wants 3X the coins value.

 

 

3) How much does the general appearance of a company's personnel make a difference (i.e. are you more comfortable dealing with someone in a coat and tie, a Tie-dyed T-shirt, or is that unimportant to you)? Please note, the answers you provide to this question could affect me personally, in regards to what attire I might have to wear at shows. Please answer honestly but very carefully.

 

I prefer that all my dealers, whom I purchase millions of dollars a year with, wear clown suits while walking around on stilts.

 

OK, OK, maybe not. I don't care what they wear. A suit and tie is a little much for me. It kind of looks pompous at shows. I'd probably prefer business casual or neat jeans. However, it's how the dealer treats me that I care about most. If he is pompous or has an attitude he'll never get a cent from me.

 

 

4) How important is it that a dealer's "back-up table" be clean (is it a no-no, for instance, for dealers to eat lunch at their tables?)

 

Food looks bad, but I understand a dealer has to eat. Just don't let it sit there for hours.

 

 

5) Are you turned-off when you see a dealer behind a table cracking open slabs?

 

Only is the shards of plastic are flying out at me.

 

 

6) Do you like to be able to easily pick up a dealer's newsletter/price list or at least a business card?

 

Business card is a must. I grab one in order to remember the dealers that I want to visit later on in the show.

 

 

7) Is it important to you if dealers accept credit card payments?

 

It's nice, but not extremely important. However, some dealers give you the look when you try to pay by check. This is especially true if you are dressed in jeans and a t-shirt and you haven't shaven in several days. For these dealers it would be nice if they took cards. It's easier to put a big purchase on a card than it is to convince the dealer that you've got cash in the bank.

 

 

8) Do you like to be "wined and dined" after the show by dealers with whom you have done sizeable deals?

 

I prefer the free hookers the ACG dealers send to my room. Wined and dined? Sizeable deals? Talk to tradedollarnut. I'm lucky if they would point me in the direction of the concession stand.

 

 

One thing a dealer must do is move people off the cases. Don't let them camp there. Don't let them cover the cases with their bags and papers. Nothing pisses me off more at shows than this.

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1) When viewing coins in dealers' cases, do you prefer that they be arranged in date and denominational order, or, for example, sorted by rarity, the type of holder they are in, or some other way?

 

I definitely prefer denominational first, then by date. One thing that I find that really gets me at some coin shows is the lack of ENOUGH light, meaning there seem to be a preponderance of dealers with three tables full of cases and one little lamp for potential customers to crowd around to look at coins. It's my hope that a dealer with a million dollar inventory will spend the extra few bucks to have enough "coin lighting".

 

2) Do you prefer that asking prices be noted on the front of the holders, the back of the holders, or is that unimportant?

 

I prefer to see a bid and ask price ( such as the greysheet) on the back of whatever the coin is stored in, and the price the dealer wants on the front. It gives me an easy point of reference rather than rifling through my price lists, and entices me to look at the coin more closely if the dealer is asking for a more substantial premium.

 

3) How much does the general appearance of a company's personnel make a difference (i.e. are you more comfortable dealing with someone in a coat and tie, a Tie-dyed T-shirt, or is that unimportant to you)? Please note, the answers you provide to this question could affect me personally, in regards to what attire I might have to wear at shows. Please answer honestly but very carefully.

 

Clean and casual does it for me. In fact, I'm highly suspect of dealers with suits, ties, rolex watches and lots of jewelry, and even avoid them sometimes. Impress me with your coins, not your wardrobe.

 

4) How important is it that a dealer's "back-up table" be clean (is it a no-no, for instance, for dealers to eat lunch at their tables?)

 

The only time it bothers me about the "backup table" is whether it's so disorganized that it takes the dealer an in-ordinate amount of time looking to see if he has what I asked for. It would be nice if the boxes where labeled with their contents as well. I always look at the "backup table" to see if there is a box or two that i may want to search through for varieties for a hidden or forgotten gem. Everyone has to eat, and I'd rather the dealer eat at his table so he is available to show me his coins.

 

5) Are you turned-off when you see a dealer behind a table cracking open slabs?

 

Cracking slabs in public is like picking your nose in public. if you must do it, do it in private!

 

6) Do you like to be able to easily pick up a dealer's newsletter/price list or at least a business card?

 

Cards and newsletters are great. Particularly the newsletters that let me know what shows there may be that I don't know about.

 

7) Is it important to you if dealers accept credit card payments?

 

Yes, for security reasons for both seller and buyer. It is also important that the dealer not have a different pricing structure for credit card payments vs other forms of payment.

 

8) Do you like to be "wined and dined" after the show by dealers with whom you have done sizeable deals?

 

A thank you and a good deal the next time I buy from you will suffice.

 

 

Good questions Mark!! laugh.gif

 

Andy

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that is a grreat thread for me since i have never been to a coin show or a coin auction for that matter

 

the small local once a year show doesnot count for me

 

i do not care waht is on a dealers back table

i do not care if he is cracking slabs all day

i do mnot care what the deak]ler looks like or how he dresses

i do not care aboyut any arrangements of any coins

the prices for all coins shuold be in plain sight

i wouild like a small business card with the contact information e mail on it in case i have to contact the dealer

 

but i would like the dealer to be reasonable with me and if i see a coin i loike i would like to see it and then make up my own mind

and i would like the dealer to be knowledgable about the coin when i ASK HIM QUESTIONS and ask for his opinions

no matter waht his opinions are i would like honesty and what he knows about the questions i ask him that he can reasonably give me an answer

 

the coin stands on its own merits to me and what it boils down to is the price and maybe some intelligent conversation about the coin i am looking at

sincerely michael

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"8) Do you like to be "wined and dined" after the show by dealers with whom you have done sizeable deals?

 

I prefer the free hookers the ACG dealers send to my room. "

 

 

lol...I gotta start buying ACG !!!

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I'd like to thank everyone who took the time to reply.

 

keithdagen, as I said to you across the street, you said :

 

" I should point out that I really appreciate a dealer, especially specialists, who are willing to take time and just share the knowledge they have, even if you aren't in a buying mode. Of course, if the show is busy, not being able to do this is understandable, but if a show is slow, as a purchaser I remember these things and am more likely to purchase from a dealer down the road because of that customer-friendly attitude"

 

I agree with that 100% - I think it is important for customer relations and for the hobby in general. We make an effort to do that with adults AND kids because kids are a large part of our future.

 

Johnny, you said, in part "Bottom line...in my opinion...even though you're busy...try to be attentive, helpful, courteous...and don't pre-judge your customer. I always dress down going to shows...but I may be the guy buying that $1000 coin from you... "

 

That is some excellent advice to all of us!

 

Oldtrader3, I appreciated your additional comments where you stated :

 

"Additional Comments: The thing that probably turns me off the fastest is a dealer, who for whatever reason, absolutely ignores me even though I may stand at their table for 10 minutes looking at them. You would be amazed at how often this happens. You really can not tell a person's balance sheet by their dress (look at what slobs some other dealers are!) or demeanor. If I stop, I saw something that interests me.

 

Most big shows can not be covered in a day (Saturday). Because, I do not draw money, drive some distance and pay to go to a show where possibly many, many of the out-of-town, dealers pack up and leave Sunday morning. If I wait and go to many shows on Sunday, I am often talking mostly to myself, except maybe some local dealers stay"

 

I have heard from many show attendees, about the rude treatment they sometimes receive. I can understand your feelings on that subject. The issue about dealers not being at shows for the whole time is one I struggle with. I can see both points of view and wish there were a perfect solution that would make everyone happy. I think that, unfortunately, there is no universal solutuion. However, if a client is going to a show to look at a particular dealer's coins, I think it's a good idea to call that dealer before the show starts, to see how long he is planning on staying. And, after all the press, hopefully most people now know that many dealers will be gone on Sundays, if not Saturdays.

 

Greg, one of your comments was "One thing a dealer must do is move people off the cases. Don't let them camp there. Don't let them cover the cases with their bags and papers. Nothing pisses me off more at shows than this."

 

Good point and I admit, sometimes I do not pay enough attention to that. I try to be careful not to do that to other dealers and their clients when I'm at other tables but need to be more aware of it at our table!

 

Android - I owe you a thank you and a good deal. You will definitely get the thank you!

 

Michael, that was a short post for you, but helpful, never the less!

 

And, as I said (for the most part) on the other board : I do not have a reply to each and every post, but I have read each of them twice, made notes and will be discussing them with everyone at Pinnacle. I can already tell you that 1) We will continue to arrange our coins in date and denominational order; 2) I can't promise changes will be made regarding the placement of prices on the front of our coins, rather than the back, but it will certainly be discussed; 3) I will continue NOT to wear a coat and tie at shows. Todd Imhof, one of Pinnacle's owners, usually does wear a coat and tie to shows. But, he really is a down to earth, nice guy (especially since he's going to be reading this!); 4) We will continue to try to keep our back-up tables neat, though you guys seem pretty reasonable in that regard anyway; 5) We rarely crack coins out of holders anyway but I agree, it looks bad at coin shows; 6) We usually have business cards on our back-up tables. but, based on your comments, will make an effort to make them more accessible; 7) Credit card payments are difficult at shows but we try to be as reasonable as possible, in accepting checks with a decent reference or two; 8) We don't really "wine and dine" clients, though we do enjoy a good conversation about coins or life in general.

 

Thanks again.

 

 

 

 

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1) When viewing coins in dealers' cases, do you prefer that they be arranged in date and denominational order, or, for example, sorted by rarity, the type of holder they are in, or some other way?

 

Definitely date and denomination order. It is MUCH easier to find a specific coin that way.

 

2) Do you prefer that asking prices be noted on the front of the holders, the back of the holders, or is that unimportant?

 

I prefer an asking price on the front of the holder.

 

3) How much does the general appearance of a company's personnel make a difference (i.e. are you more comfortable dealing with someone in a coat and tie, a Tie-dyed T-shirt, or is that unimportant to you)? Please note, the answers you provide to this question could affect me personally, in regards to what attire I might have to wear at shows. Please answer honestly but very carefully.

 

A suit and tie strikes me as overkill at most coin shows. I generally don't worry about what the dealer is wearing.

 

4) How important is it that a dealer's "back-up table" be clean (is it a no-no, for instance, for dealers to eat lunch at their tables?)

 

Couldn't care less. I understand that dealers have rather long shifts at most shows, and I'd rather have one eating at his table and able to answer my question than away from his booth grabbing lunch.

 

5) Are you turned-off when you see a dealer behind a table cracking open slabs?

 

YES!

 

6) Do you like to be able to easily pick up a dealer's newsletter/price list or at least a business card?

 

A business card comes in handy. A newsletter or price list is a bit much to have out on the table, but if you have one it's probably a good idea to bring it with you.

 

7) Is it important to you if dealers accept credit card payments?

 

I don't generally buy valuable enough coins that I need to worry about such things.

 

8) Do you like to be "wined and dined" after the show by dealers with whom you have done sizeable deals?

 

See above. smile.gif

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Mark - good post but I have to ask: these questions seem so simplistic, would Pinnacle ever really need coaching on these points? I apologize in advance as I myself never attend shows. But I would like to know if there are differences in dealers. Would you mind giving us non-show collectors the run down on your impressions of how dealers present themselves? For example 25% of the dealers are cracking slabs all day long. Se what I mean? What % of the floor are top tier dealers, vs. mom and pop shops. I would like to hear your impression of dealers at shows for all of the questions you asked. Are different shows different? Thanks.

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lincolnSence,

 

I like your user name!

 

 

I posted the questions because I truly feel that we can learn from the feedback on these boards. Often, the replies confirm what we already think, but sometimes they surprise us. Here are a few surprises (to me, at least, and perhaps I shouldn't have been surprised but I was) from the recent threads I posted:

 

1) A larger number of posters than I would have estimated, prefer that the prices be on the front of the coins.

 

2) A larger number of posters than I would have estimated, might view a dealer wearing a coat and tie as a negative, rather than as neutral or a positive.

 

3) We should have our business cards at the front of our table, rather than behind it. Sounds logical but sometimes we forget about things like that.

 

4) A number of people would be suspicious of dealers who buy them dinner!

 

5) People are apparently understanding of dealers who eat at their tables (as long as they do so neatly). I try to avoid it (or to eat really fast) because I don't think it looks good. But, people understand. I might take an extra minute next show.

 

Equally important, are the things that the replies confirm or remind us to keep doing. As one example - I will now be better about making sure people at our table don't spread their books and papers out on our cases so as to block the view of others. It seems like a no brainer but the reminder helped!

 

The replies help us to better see things from a different viewpoint.

 

In answer to some of your other questions -

 

Many dealers do things (or fail to do things) which result in potential clients being made uncomfortable to the point of not wanting to do business with them. I'll leave it at that.

 

Top tier dealers vs. small/mom and pop? If you're talking about the type of coins we like to deal in, there are a LOT more (maybe in the ratio of 10 to 1 or higher) of the latter.

 

Many shows that we attend present the above situations. Perhaps the smaller ones, that we attend less frequently, have a higher percentage of dealers who don't crack coins out all day long and who are more polite to the general public.

 

Good questions - I hope I answered them satisfactorily.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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