What is this Improperly Annealed Planchet
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So I learned a new term today. Improperly Annealed Planchet. It has left me with quite a few questions. I often wonder why there are so many black, brown, yellow, etc coins on EBay for sale when everybody says if the weight is correct then it's nota Clad error, and a Clad error will only look like a penny. Apparently this isn't entirely true. I mean, no, they are Clad errors...but they are errors all the same. Am I right? I've put many nice dimes and quarters back into circulation in the short time I've been doing this because I thought theywere junk, environmental, or had just 'been in the ground for a while'. Then I see this 2015 Homestead that is truly a beautiful coin but is so different, and obviously has not 'been in the ground' for years. 

So. Can somebody enlighten me about the IAP(so much easier) error and its value, both monetary and otherwise, to fellow collectors? Please? I just feel like I been left out of this one, and I do hate to be left out. It's just like not being picked until last. Lol! But really y'all, inform a chick about this. What is it? Isit so rare that I couldn't possibly have many in front of me? Are people just not intetested in it? Is this what people are calling a Clad error on Ebay? Info! Info! Info please? And thank you.

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An Improperly Annealed Planchet is when the heat/cool mixture between strikings if off just a little bit causing the coin being struck to have a colored appearance. The colors can be many. From grey to black to yellow and even purple among others.  But be careful not to confuse the color with simple Post Mint Damage like somebody getting it red hot and then throwing it into ice water, which can be very similar. 

*if you chose to try that please make sure you don't burn or otherwise hurt yourself. That would be dumb. 

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1 hour ago, KarenHolcomb said:

An Improperly Annealed Planchet is when the heat/cool mixture between strikings if off just a little bit causing the coin being struck to have a colored appearance. The colors can be many. From grey to black to yellow and even purple among others.  But be careful not to confuse the color with simple Post Mint Damage like somebody getting it red hot and then throwing it into ice water, which can be very similar. 

*if you chose to try that please make sure you don't burn or otherwise hurt yourself. That would be dumb. 

And you have taught me more about something Karen!  I've never really researched this particular issue, but your explanation is very interesting and concise.  I may need to seek out some examples of IAP's.....they sound interesting!

~Tom

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Well, they were my pet peeve for a day or two. Everybody kept saying PMD and been buried, etc and I just couldn't accept it. But it would be very difficult to figure out which are IA and which are PMD. But it's still always a possibility.

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Except if it was an improperly annealed planchet I would have expected the scraping on the edge as it was ejected out of the collar to cut through the oxide layer and exposed fresh metal.  Since the edge shows the same oxidation as the obverse and reverse I would suspect environmental damage.

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Coins with improperly annealed planchets will typically show dark brown coloration, like the coin above, but can also tone deep purple or have spots of purple and blue and yellow. The easy way to tell the difference between an annealing error (which happens before striking) and environmental damage (which happens after striking), is that the luster of the annealing error coin will typically be uninterrupted and flowing freely over the discolorations. Corrosion will disfigure or destroy luster, but there are luster flow lines struck into annealed surfaces.

Edited by coinman1794
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On 9/15/2018 at 8:54 AM, stash-1 said:

Here's my latest find for an improperly annealed coin . Notice how the teeth on the rim look brand new . That one way to tell the real deal .

20171210_140026.jpg.75e201d9ae24dc67583e02c762c5ffb3.jpg20171210_135952.jpg.29d320d7c20a89308e8227985d443209.jpg

SingleShot0001-2017.thumb.jpg.5d6dcd9918749734215eefd5f7d96da1.jpg

 

Anybody that thinks this coin isn't improperly annealed, fred weinberg will be glad to answer all your questions .

https://www.cointalk.com/threads/2017-d-new-jersey-ellis-island-improper-annealing.307775/

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On 9/15/2018 at 11:01 PM, coinman1794 said:

Coins with improperly annealed planchets will typically show dark brown coloration, like the coin above, but can also tone deep purple or have spots of purple and blue and yellow. The easy way to tell the difference between an annealing error (which happens before striking) and environmental damage (which happens after striking), is that the luster of the annealing error coin will typically be uninterrupted and flowing freely over the discolorations. Corrosion will disfigure or destroy luster, but there are luster flow lines struck into annealed surfaces.

Good to know. IAP is an area that I have become especially interested in and so far I have not been fortunate enough to find a read that tells me how to know the difference. I just know that I got tired of hearing PMD and seeing the same looking coins on eBay as missing clad and I knew they weren't missing clad, so there had to be another explanation other than PMD. It seems not many are aware of the error, as you see this was one of my 1st posts and I had to come back and answer my own question, so I have made it my mission to get the word out. Lol!

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16 hours ago, stash-1 said:

Anybody that thinks this coin isn't improperly annealed, fred weinberg will be glad to answer all your questions .

https://www.cointalk.com/threads/2017-d-new-jersey-ellis-island-improper-annealing.307775/

I love it Dude. I learned the term in May and all the hype about it hadn't started yet. I'm very happy to see google results of actually IAP coins being graded and recognized now, because there were none in May.

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2 hours ago, KarenHolcomb said:

I love it Dude. I learned the term in May and all the hype about it hadn't started yet. I'm very happy to see google results of actually IAP coins being graded and recognized now, because there were none in May.

Here's the only one I own that's graded .

7902-vert.thumb.jpg.534e353e65ab5361314583ac8603721d.jpg414718219_7902-vert(2).thumb.jpg.5c4520e52a33e1fcef18e7bb209ee733.jpg

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