1943-P Jefferson War Nickel weighing 4.68 grams?
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10 posts in this topic

Hey all,

anyone encounter a nickel similar in weight?  I know variance but isn’t this to low for a variance.  Scale checks out, not broken or off.  I’d appreciate any thoughts or advice on what this could be.  Thanks so much guys!

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Should be 5g; however, weights and alloy of these critters was not well controlled.

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Absolutely,

I’m learning just how fast and loose certain time periods use the word ‘variance’ 😁

I thought maybe it could’ve possibly been a counterfeit at that weight as I have read it was a common coin to do that with back when.

 

Thank you for your response, I really appreciate the advice!

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Possibility of environmental damage, counterfeit which would kill me if it was since its a war nickel, i dont think it be worth it to counterfeit that. And lastly an underweight planchet used for the striking of your coin which is worth a little premium :D

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It's just about a 10th of a gram out of tolerance. So it's probably been struck on a slightly real thin planchet. But a 10th of a gram out of tolerance probably isn't enough for it to have any premium value.

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You’re probably right...then again I’m constantly astounded what oddities seem I draw premiums when selling 🙂

maybe I’ll just put it up for a million dollars or best offer and see what eBay folk offer if anything.

 

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Ah, I see.  I couldn’t pull the name but that was indeed the person I was thinking of when counterfeiting crossed my mind.   Thanks for the god info fellas, I’ve inherited this huge collection and over The past six months I’ve been l learning and now it’s part of my life but just so, so many different coins of every single denomination.  Good to have fine folks to bounce an idea or verify a coin with as they come up.  I have the books but when it comes to final say, I have been looking towards the members here and it’s been nothing but collective, balls accurate information.  Thanks again fellas!

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Minor coins were checked in bulk for weight and only occasionally for alloy. The WW-II nickels were checked less frequently than usual largely due to the high defect rate of ingots and shortness of time. The reason for the poor alloy was never actually implemented during the war since the types of automated coin rejectors were not put into production until the late 1940s.

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