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Exciting news for the Full Step Jefferson series!

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For those of you who are unfamiliar with collecting this series, in my 12+ years experience, this series has the most missing, nonexistent dates of all series. Of course, that's my opinion. 3-4 years ago a very good friend and a 28 year veteran FS Jefferson collector told me that a 6 step 1961-D had sold for 2 grand. Is that possible? The great original FSNC, PAKMAN Adolf Weiss once told me that someone had a complete 6 step Jefferson nickel collection but didn't say who had it. I have an off-centered 1949 that shows a nice 6 steps. Then there are the few dates that barely exist in 5 steps like the 38-S, type one 39PDS, 60-D, 61-D, 63-D, 68-D, 69-D and 69-S, where there are maybe only one or two FS examples. And what about 6 step nickels? For the whole series from 1938 to 2003, roughly 75% to 80% of the dates can not be had in 6 steps. In just a very few short years we have seen many great nickels surface and enter the field. As these nonexistent coins continue to surface and enter into great collections, many tough dates that were impossible to locate for many years will become available. We'll see a great surge of interest in the FS Jefferson nickel series as more collectors continue to enter the numismatic hobby to assemble a full step Jefferson nickel collection. The chemistry is just about right for this series if the gap continues to close between a pop-top coin and the next lower grade coin.

All I can say is, keep your eyes and ears open and watch this series explode as more coins and collectors surface to assemble this series. If these coins come onto the market fast enough to keep ahead of the demand and into the right hands, the prices will stablize to a level everyone can live with. This is going to happen! Just watch and see!

 

Leo

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Thanks for your information. An interesting note about your '49 with FS is that many off-center coins will display the full strike diagnostics because of the way they were struck. As an example, I have seen a few '45 Mercs with FB reverses that were 20% or so off-center.

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I like full step nickels, but then I like just about any coin with a nice full strike. The problem with a FS nickel collection is that too many of the coins are too rare. These can never really catch on as a mass market simply because the set is nearly impossible to assemble and if large numbers of people tried the prices of even some of the more common ones would go far too high to afford. I think of assortments of these coins as "steppy" or having many steps when selected for strike. "Steppy" sets can be put together for reasonable prices. And the beauty of it is that even if much larger numbers of people were trying, most of the prices would remain quite reasonable. Of course, that near gem '68-D three step wouldn't sell for $1 anymore.

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Thanks for your information. An interesting note about your '49 with FS is that many off-center coins will display the full strike diagnostics because of the way they were struck. As an example, I have seen a few '45 Mercs with FB reverses that were 20% or so off-center.

 

Hi Tom

My reasoning is, since the 6th step was on the die and on my off-center 1949 then it's likely there are 6 step 1949 nickels out there. I have located all the following in 6 steps; 1946, 46-D, 47-D, 47-S, 48-D, 49-S, 50-D just to name a few. Read the next post for more inf.

 

Leo

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I like full step nickels, but then I like just about any coin with a nice full strike. The problem with a FS nickel collection is that too many of the coins are too rare. These can never really catch on as a mass market simply because the set is nearly impossible to assemble and if large numbers of people tried the prices of even some of the more common ones would go far too high to afford. I think of assortments of these coins as "steppy" or having many steps when selected for strike. "Steppy" sets can be put together for reasonable prices. And the beauty of it is that even if much larger numbers of people were trying, most of the prices would remain quite reasonable. Of course, that near gem '68-D three step wouldn't sell for $1 anymore.

 

Hi Cladking

Collecting the FS Jefferson's is like collecting the Lincohn Memorial cents, it's too modern and new. With a little will power, knowhow and searching, most high grade FS dates can be located for under a dollar. The semi toughies, $5 to $10. But sure, if you take the certified route then your going to pay out of your geezer to assemble a set. 27_laughing.gif

 

Leo

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I recently found, in an original roll a 6 step 45-P and a near miss 6 step coin. POP1 at NGC currently, however I sent it to PCGS for grading. It staying in my set for now but should be crossed to NGC in the event that I decide to sell it.

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A 1968-D ANACS MS65 5 steps fetches $2600 in Teletrade recently. This is a little of the medicine I was referring to in my opening post. Keep your eyes open, there's more to come. makepoint.gif

 

Leo

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