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Someone grade my coin.

17 posts in this topic

I am new to coins and have several Morgans this is the quality of what I have and I am curious what people think as far as the grade the back is just as nice.. There are no indentions on the outer rim of the coin the scan is bad. Thanks,

 

111090963.jpg

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AU is almost uncirculated. This means the coin has full detail and much mint luster with some wear on the high points of the coin relief. Normally AU coins are broken down into (4) grades: AU50, AU53, AU55 and AU58. These numbers represent the amount of wear on the details. AU50 coins would show a fair amount of high point wear. Yours are probably AU50 (hard to tell from scans). AU58 coins look almost like uncirculated coins. You can get a copy of Photograde which will help you refine your grading skills if you wish.

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What does a MS60 coin look like and do some of this look like they may be MS. Thanks. (This coins have been stored for 40 years) My scanner doesn't do them any justice as far as luster and shine.

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Is hard to tell anything from your scans. They are just to small and out of focus looking. The 1880 could be MS something. Is it an "O" mint?

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These look like high-end AU (About Uncirculated) coins that, in years past, were sold in "UNC" rolls. I can't tell you how many times I've looked at rolls of 1885-O, 1883-O and 1904-O Morgans that an "investor" bought as UNC years ago, only to find out that they were heavily dipped slider (AU) coins. For some reason, these three New Orleans years were heavily targeted by promoters back then, I guess because they are so plentiful and cheap.

 

Strangely, when you find "UNC" rolls of 1880-S and 1881-S Morgans, they really are MS coins, and not sliders, but again, the "O" mints are very often found as sliders.

 

James

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"Dipped sliders" refers to coins that are close to UNC, yet are really AU, but that somebody (usually an unscrupulous dealer) dipped in hopes of making them "look" UNC. That way, the unscrupulous dealer can charge more for the coins.

 

Usually, as with the case of the "O" mint coins I've mentioned, they end up toning with an unnatural grey sheen like the ones you imaged, because the lightly worn areas that were dipped do not tone the same as the rest of the coin that really is un-worn.

 

James

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Great Info. When you say dipped what are coins dipped in. And how can I test for that. Also This coins were bought from the bank years ago. They were bank vault inventory. I put them in plastic cases. I am a comic expert but know nothing about coins.

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Coins are usally dipped for 2 main reasons... one they are dull looking or two they look black or have ugly toning(colors) on them... Dipping is not a harmfull pratice if done correctly.... Dipping is usally done to try and bring out the luster in a coin(Shine that mint state coins have) The only way to determine a value on the set it to see a pic or dates and grades....

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Bigger picture I hope Seems ot me this looks like the MS's I see graded on ebay

 

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Note to jduran1... Ebay grading is always way off... look for pictures of slabbed coins... and is there a mint mark on that 1900 Morgan? I still say AU55

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I'd agree with AU-55.

 

Dipping of Morgans like what I described earlier was prevalent in the late 1970s and early 1980s. There's a guy at one of the local coin shops that used to work for one of the big national silver dollar promoters, and they had a business term for this:

 

"DIP & SHIP"

 

As he explained it to me, they actually had an assembly line, with bathtubs containing various stages of dipping solution - in other words, "acid". They would dump literally bucketfuls of silver dollars into the first solution, the strong acid, agitate the tub, then strain out the coins, dump them into the next tub for a rinse, bring those back out again, then one more dump into a final rinse, and finally air-dry the coins. Then, the dollars would go into the rolling machines and be shipped off for sale to the unwary as "BU BANK ROLLS".

 

This is the story straight from the horse's mouth. During the silver craze, this was evidently an extremely profitable business. The result today is that I have on countless occasions done appraisals of estates that contained tons of Morgan dollar rolls, allegedly "bank wrapped UNC rolls", that turned out to be "dip and ship" hoards.

 

James

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