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1776-1976 Dollar Coin Question
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12 posts in this topic

Recently started going thru my small collection of coins and ran across this coin with questions. I have been researching this all afternoon and find nothing on it. The question is on the front of the 1776-1976 Dollar there are some pits or crater type spots on the face/cheek. Being new at this I am not sure if its a misused coin or maybe something happened on the minting of the coin. Any help or thoughts are appreciated. 

Thanks

 

1776-1976 Dollar Front F001.JPG

1776-1976 Dollar Back F001.JPG

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Hello and welcome to the forum!

While this may possibly be an error for a coin that is called "struck thru" which means the coin was struck with some kind of foreign object(s) [grease, dirt, wire, cloth, etc.] in the dies at the time of the strike, I am leaning towards that this could be an error as I denote there is also a lack of detail in the hair area which does not seem to be ground or worn off. I am not sure what caused the "pebbly" effect across the face, however. In addition, there seems to be a flatness in the area of the eyebrow. Possibly the die was filled with grease enough to cause lack of detail and thick enough to make that pebbly effect.

I shall let the others provide their opinions to follow mine as my opinion is only one of many.

Edited by powermad5000
incorrect original diagnosis
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On 7/9/2024 at 6:10 PM, Sandon said:

In my opinion, this is just damage, possibly from repeated strikes by a pointed object.

Have you noted the lack of just about all detail in the hair? I thought the same thing at first until I took a harder look and noticed there is really no detail in the hair and revised my original statement.

It is possible this started out as an error in the beginning and was damaged later as well. That would be another possibility.

Edited by powermad5000
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   "Type 2" Bicentennial Eisenhower dollars don't have much detail in the hair to begin with, and this one appears to have been abraded with something as well as abused with some object. The numerous marks appear to show displaced metal around their borders, which is inconsistent with a "strikethrough" but quite consistent with damage.

   Compare the obverse of this 1976-D "Type 2", graded MS 65 by PCGS:

1976-Dtype2dollarobv..thumb.jpg.63b9168b34d25a14879b7779e0e57b83.jpg

1976-Dtype2dollarrev..thumb.jpg.c9aed591db400fadc474cefdf80051ed.jpg

 

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good lookin shots of the coin, how did you get the detail so clear? I like the color. I did recheck the coin in question and there actually is more hair detail but the scanner must of washed it out. Got a new microscope coming tomorrow so maybe it will fix that issue.

Thanks

 

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   I use an inexpensive digital microscope, which I have to place on top of a pile of books to image an entire side of a coin this large. It can be difficult to image uncirculated coins, especially those in plastic holders due to the glare from the coin and the holder. I turn off the LED lights on the scope and aim a desk lamp at an angle from the side. Sometimes it takes a while to get a satisfactory image.

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On 7/9/2024 at 8:27 PM, Knox2019 said:

Good info thanks

 

If it were not for the fact you are a Newbie and therefore entitled to a courteous reception, these are the impertinent comments and questions I would have asked:

1.  The coin featured is nearly 50 years old.  What would anyone expect a large, heavy coin to look like after being in circulation that long?

2.  Anyone notice the pockmarked craters on the moon is missing one?

3.  Why is it the scar on Ike's neck sustained when he was assaulted during his tenure as President of Columbia University is prominently featured on Sandon's superbly detailed Denver Mint- produced example, but is conspicuously absent from the OPs Philadelphia example?

4.  Why is it inquisitive collectors (and non-collectors alike) are told the text clearly visible on either side of the bell's die break -- a design feature authorized by law -- is classified and it's full disclosure is prohibited by Federal law?

5.  Why is it anyone who so much as suggests he is one of the few members in possession of an Ike whose letters A and M, in AMERICA, are widely-spaced, is automatically denounced and threatened to be taken before a firing squad maintained by Powermad (ordinarily used to dispatch counterfeiters?)  🤣

To the OP:  Welcome to the Forum and thanks for being a good sport!

(Posted at the discretion of Moderators.)

 

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