1946 Jefferson D nickel help
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10 posts in this topic

So I was going through my Jefferson collection and came across this 46 that looked different. I’m still learning about strikes, doubling etc. looks like some possible errors here? 

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On 8/11/2022 at 3:24 AM, Lem E said:

Hello. I see nothing to indicate any errors on this coin. This nickel has seen heavy circulation and has accrued a few bumps and bruises along the way. The voids on the obverse could suggest this coin was plucked from the ground at some point, cleaned up and put back into circulation or took some heavy shots in that area. The mintmark looks to have taken a hit and displaced the metal. This coin lived a hard life and what exactly happened to it is hard to say. Everything you see is most likely PMD (Post Mint Damage). No value over face.

I agree with Lem That nickel has had a tough life

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On 8/11/2022 at 3:24 AM, Lem E said:

Hello. I see nothing to indicate any errors on this coin. This nickel has seen heavy circulation and has accrued a few bumps and bruises along the way. The voids on the obverse could suggest this coin was plucked from the ground at some point, cleaned up and put back into circulation or took some heavy shots in that area. The mintmark looks to have taken a hit and displaced the metal. This coin lived a hard life and what exactly happened to it is hard to say. Everything you see is most likely PMD (Post Mint Damage). No value over face.

Ditto

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On 8/11/2022 at 8:55 AM, Nysmith9 said:

Should I delete this or leave it up?

Leave it up. It may help a future collector.

And, if I haven't already told you, "Welcome to the forum."

Edited by Just Bob
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On 8/11/2022 at 8:14 AM, Nysmith9 said:

Thank you! Look forward to sharing and learning!

With coins like these, your key learning is to understand how coins were/are struck, and what sorts of damage can legitimately happen during that process. That's what one asks oneself. Once you understand the most common types of errors, and how they occur, you can master the question. Some are so common they aren't even considered collectible, and some may even be considered detracting flaws. Others are not so common and can be prized by those who collect such things. It just takes time and study.

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Welcome.  This is only my opinion, but I think starting coin collecting as an error collector is a big mistake.  There are so many variables, and one truly has to understand the minting process.  Otherwise, your eyes will send you on wild goose chases and leave you in a world of headache/heartache and a pile of face value coins. I started just like you... looking for that needle in a haystack (without really knowing what a "needle" was).  This changed the day I walked into a coin shop and a friendly dealer educated me.

So, I started with a type set, because I "want it all" (and cannot afford it all).  I really didn't have a direction, and with type collecting - that's okay.  While collecting types, I learned how to pick quality coins, I learned grading principals ( and grading variance) and how commercial grading impacts prices, I learned the principals of EAC "net" grading (and am still learning).  I also found some types I loved along the way, and started a few series (still under construction).

You do not have to buy coins to become good at spotting quality.  In fact, I would not suggest going to a coin show and buying a bunch of graded coins.  You will have to go to shows and put a lot of coins in your hands.  You will have to memorize what the differences are between VF and MS coins.  Each design type will wear differently, and they are stuck differently.  Every series is a new education.  Most of the value in coins comes from the coins condition/preservation.  You need to see coins in PCGS/NGC holders to know what mint state is, understand its impact on the financials, and know when you see one out of the holder.  This takes looking at thousands of coins (literally).  You can also look online, but nothing is as good as in-hand.

I cannot overstate the importance of learning how to spot quality coins in this hobby.  As you progress, you will soon realize that "this MS64 looks better than that MS64 (or even a MS65)."  Grading inconsistency can work in your favor (buying under graded), or work against you (buying over graded).  Again, I am not trying to say "go out and buy graded coins (or even go out and buy coins)".  But, looking at graded coins is the best way to train your eyes.

If errors are REALLY your passion, you REALLY need to study all of the resources available.  Several websites exist to help educate you on the minting process and how errors occur.  There are many folks here that know errors, too.  Again, as a total beginner... errors are a tough row to hoe.  

Good luck and welcome to the forum. 

 

Edited by The Neophyte Numismatist
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