1943 steel pennies
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24 posts in this topic

 

On 5/13/2022 at 9:58 PM, Lisa8675309 said:

Going through my 1943 steel pennies I have a few with errors. Are any of these vAluable? This one seems to have doubling 20220513_155449.thumb.jpg.3cec6604ce63080eb5259e23d34b7d35.jpg

 

On 5/13/2022 at 9:58 PM, Lisa8675309 said:

Going through my 1943 steel pennies I have a few with errors. Are any of these vAluable? This one seems to have doubling 20220513_155449.thumb.jpg.3cec6604ce63080eb5259e23d34b7d35.jpg

This one his eye looks

On 5/13/2022 at 9:58 PM, Lisa8675309 said:

Going through my 1943 steel pennies I have a few with errors. Are any of these vAluable? This one seems to have doubling 20220513_155449.thumb.jpg.3cec6604ce63080eb5259e23d34b7d35.jpg

different 20220513_155548.thumb.jpg.4e587aaede6eddd071dfc6e0a575b68d.jpg

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This one then edge looks like a die bleed or something on the edge amd the 4 looks double the word TRUST looks like flat smooshed letters20220513_154832.thumb.jpg.af6ecb604d802c350f60c2751d371dfb.jpg

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I see no doubling or errors, just some lightly circulated coins and the last 1943 has environmental damage.    And in case you are wondering, no none of these steel cents are worth submitting, the 1943-D might be uncirculated (difficult to be sure when the coin is in a 2X2) but a low MS grade at best the others are all AU or damaged.

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  • Member: Seasoned Veteran

The first coin is a "process job." In other words its original zinc plating was stripped and a new plating applied. This was a cottage industry in the 1950s and '60s, and such coins will not receive numeric grades. The third coin is an example of why so many steelies were processed, as this is how nearly all the circulated pieces looked when found in change. The 1943-D has been cleaned, but it does appear to have its original zinc.

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Not too long after zinc coated steel cents were introduced, the Mint began looking for ways to darken them before issue. The bright zinc coating caused confusion with dimes, although from this far in the future it seems difficult to believe. (Yes, it is documented. Even the President complained.)

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  • Member: Seasoned Veteran

When you die you bleed? (shrug)

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Posted (edited)
On 5/15/2022 at 9:51 AM, DWLange said:

When you die you bleed? (shrug)

I thought that was when the bleeding stopped. But yes, by all means, let’s make up brand new numismatic terms. /sarcasm

And while we’re at it, be careful with the word “smooshed”. It will only confuse the elongate collectors. /yep, more sarcasm

Edited by VKurtB
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On 5/15/2022 at 11:08 AM, VKurtB said:

 

And while we’re at it, be careful with the word “smooshed”. It will only confuse the elongate collectors. /yep, more sarcasm

Don't worry. We will just switch over to calling them "squished" and keep on trucking.

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The eBay sellers of those awful souvenir vinyl wallets for holding elongated cents always refer to these coins as "pressed pennies." 😮

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On 5/15/2022 at 6:11 PM, DWLange said:

The eBay sellers of those awful souvenir vinyl wallets for holding elongated cents always refer to these coins as "pressed pennies." 😮

Are they the “Mickey Mouse” ones sold at Disney parks?

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On 5/15/2022 at 7:11 PM, DWLange said:

The eBay sellers of those awful souvenir vinyl wallets for holding elongated cents always refer to these coins as "pressed pennies."

Used for squeezing money out of insufficiently_thoughtful_persons.

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I never even knew they had a name. I remember seeing the contraptions in Coney Island and Times Square amusement arcades. Pressed pennies. And the ones placed on railroad tracks are rolled pennies? Nice.

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Believe it or not, “Quintus”, there is an entire class at the World’s Fair of Money exhibits for elongated (the proper term) coins. Believe it or not, there is more interest in that class, elongates, than there is for mint errors. Now, tell me the divide between the in-person hobby, and the Internet based hobby, isn’t a gaping yawning chasm. 

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I can distinctly recall the one in Times Square. It was self-service, with a slot to insert your penny, after you've deposited 25 or 50 cents, and a very large handle you could rotate and see the press produce the finished product which was returned to you in a dedicated coin return slot. 😉 

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Posted (edited)
On 5/28/2022 at 9:27 PM, Quintus Arrius said:

I can distinctly recall the one in Times Square. It was self-service, with a slot to insert your penny, after you've deposited 25 or 50 cents, and a very large handle you could rotate and see the press produce the finished product which was returned to you in a dedicated coin return slot. 😉 

You’ve described a typical elongate machine. I carry a half roll of red BU 1968-S cents with me when I travel to get a nice elongate when I encounter a neat design. In Britain, they are preloaded with One Penny coins made of copper coated steel and those buggers are MUCH harder to crank. I’ve run into British machines that take 20p and 50p to operate. 

Edited by VKurtB
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The TEC club (The Elongate Collectors) meet annually at the ANA World’s Fair of Money each August and they keep a booklet up to date of all known U.S. elongate machines. Since there are only two manufacturers, and both have people in the club, it’s not a huge problem. 

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This conversation brings up the question - Those "smooshers" at amusement parks are made to work with soft copper and zinc cents. What would happen if you put a steel cent in one? :whistle:

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On 5/28/2022 at 10:57 PM, MorganMan said:

This conversation brings up the question - Those "smooshers" at amusement parks are made to work with soft copper and zinc cents. What would happen if you put a steel cent in one? :whistle:

It’d still work, but you’ll need to have eaten your Wheaties, if you’re of the age to get that reference. 

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Posted (edited)
On 5/29/2022 at 12:00 AM, VKurtB said:

It’d still work, but you’ll need to have eaten your Wheaties, if you’re of the age to get that reference. 

I stopped eating wheaties when I saw what they did to Jenner. :roflmao:

Edited by MorganMan
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On 5/28/2022 at 10:27 PM, Quintus Arrius said:

I can distinctly recall the one in Times Square. It was self-service, with a slot to insert your penny, after you've deposited 25 or 50 cents, and a very large handle you could rotate and see the press produce the finished product which was returned to you in a dedicated coin return slot. 😉 

I remember when I was very young, around 7 or 8 yo, we got to use one of those at Cedar Point in Ohio. I prefer the term "mashed." Dad let my sister and I both mash us one each with a little bit of help from him. I remember us not being strong enough to turn the wheel ourselves.  I still got mine somewhere. Thats the only time I ever used one of those. Ive also came across a couple others over the years. I put them in a jar when I see them but thats bout it. Dont really collect them. This thread just brought back that old memory that day. 

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