First time seeing WWII OPA Tokens in hand
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11 posts in this topic

"Blue" points were exchanged for oysters, and "Red" points were exchanged for herring.....Well, that's what the internet says.

;)

Here's a short explanation: https://bobstokens.com/the-history-of-opa-tokens/

Here's ANA's article: https://www.money.org/collector/user_66708/blog/a-guide-to-ww2-opa-tokens-an-obscure-section-of-numismatics

Here's Wikkidoodle's version: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Office_of_Price_Administration

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On 4/30/2022 at 8:44 PM, RWB said:

"Blue" points were exchanged for oysters, and "Red" points were exchanged for herring.....Well, that's what the internet says.

;)

Here's a short explanation: https://bobstokens.com/the-history-of-opa-tokens/

Here's ANA's article: https://www.money.org/collector/user_66708/blog/a-guide-to-ww2-opa-tokens-an-obscure-section-of-numismatics

Here's Wikkidoodle's version: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Office_of_Price_Administration

Thank you for the links. Quite interesting info.

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I picked up a few years ago to go with my ration booklets, tax tokens, and food stamp tokens. I still run across them in dealer bins and albums from time to time. A cool little piece of history. Thanks for sharing.

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  • Member: Seasoned Veteran

I don't collect the tokens, but I have some old coin boards made for their collecting.

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Wonder if you had a choice on what color you got due to what you prefer to eat? I find things like that interesting. This could be a topic I could research further. 

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Posted (edited)

I sold a complete box of 'reds' not too long ago on the bay. When I was a kid, that box was the go-to toy when I visited my grandma. There is a letter combination that's a bit scarcer, but I don't think there are any that are particularly valuable. The blues are a little scarcer than the reds.

Edited by thebeav
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  • Member: Seasoned Veteran

The color distinctions had to do with the nature of the food. One was for meat and the other was for non-meat products, I believe. The tokens were used to make change for ration coupons and could be exchanged for the latter when enough had accumulated.

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Posted (edited)

Yes the tokens were for making change.  In the early years of rationing the stamps were worth a set amount of points but items purchased  were often for a fewer number of points and there was no way to make change, so you just lost those points when you made a purchase.

On 5/2/2022 at 6:46 AM, thebeav said:

There is a letter combination that's a bit scarcer, but I don't think there are any that are particularly valuable. The blues are a little scarcer than the reds.

There are two letter combinations that have some value.  The red MM and the red MV.  The MM is relatively low value in the $5 - $10 range.  The MV can easily go for around $100.  When I first started collecting the OPA tokens there were only 24 MV tokens known.  More have turned up over the years and today there are probably 150 - 200 of them.  The blur tokens are a little scarcer and there are four blue tokens with combinations that start with W that are a little tougher, but not so much as to command a serious premium.

 

Edited by Conder101
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Love those OPA tokens, they are a blast to collect and won't break the bank. I just read a Coin World article about them that was pretty good, I'll PM you. 

JIM (Japanese Invasion Money) notes are also a very popular collecting area, in addition to the coins.

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