1950 penny no mint
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20 posts in this topic

Vero,

I don't know where you're getting your coin information, but it's wrong.  The 1950 cents from all three mints are extremely common, even today, and in circulated grades have about three cents worth of copper in them.  None of them are rare at all, including the D.  Philly made 272,686,386 cents in 1950, Denver made 334,950,000 and San Francisco made 118,505,000.  You have to get to the grades of MS 67 Red on any of them to get to a point where they have any kind of significant value.  The coin you posted is pretty much worth face value.  If I received it in change, I'd release it back out into the wild with no concern at all.  The 1950-D cent thing you said makes me suspect that you're getting coin information from YouTube videos, because that's the exact kind of misinformation that gets spread around on there.  If you are watching coin videos on YouTube, stop immediately.  They are full of blatant lies and worthless, deceptive misinformation.  These YouTube people are looking for hits......they're looking to rack up the numbers of people who watch the garbage they produce.  And they'll say or do almost anything to achieve this goal.

Edited by Mohawk
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On 11/14/2021 at 4:43 PM, Vero86 said:

Thank you Mohawk, yes probably were I'm getting the information is wrong,  I appreciate your comments, this is why I ask because I know that I will get a straight answer, will be more carefull on what I read.

Excellent Vero.....that's what we all want here, to share good, accurate coin information so that collectors have good knowledge and can be successful.  And, yes, any place that says a 1950-D cent is something special is definitely giving you a giant load of BS.  One place that is good for learning about all kinds of U.S. coinage is our hosts' Coin Explorer area.  Here's a link to that site:

https://www.ngccoin.com/coin-explorer/united-states/

Edited by Mohawk
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On 11/14/2021 at 10:11 PM, VKurtB said:

A 1950 PROOF cent is a nice find, but this coin is NOT one.

That is indeed true, Kurt.  A 1950 Proof Cent is definitely a nice find.  I probably should have factored that into my initial response, but I didn't want to be confusing.

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On 11/14/2021 at 4:43 PM, Vero86 said:

Thank you Mohawk, yes probably were I'm getting the information is wrong,  I appreciate your comments, this is why I ask because I know that I will get a straight answer, will be more carefull on what I read.

You don't have to be careful about what you read.  It's what you believe where prudence is best exercised.  

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I'll weigh in on this too..    The penny you are looking at is not rare.  I have plenty of them.  Wheat pennies are still in circulation, though you don't see as many as a few years ago.

HOWEVER...  If you are building a collection to inspire your Grandkids to get them interested in Coins - that will be a very inexpensive "Curiosity" for them to look at and compare.  I'm building a "Century Series" (not to be confused with Fighter aircraft of the 50's&60's) for when my GKids Graduate High School.  So hang on to it for trade at least, but is till is low value - especially in that condition.  After all it is a 70 year old coin.  (I agree....stay OFF the internet.)  Well done on the picture.

Chris

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If you get a chance at a show or something, ask to see a really nice 1950 proof cent. It is a wondrous thing to behold. Many are impaired, but the really nice ones are really neat.

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On 11/18/2021 at 1:37 PM, Conder101 said:

You are probably thinking of the 1950 D NICKEL, not the cent.

You know, Conder, I never even thought of that! :facepalm:  I bet you're absolutely correct!

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On 11/18/2021 at 3:31 PM, Mohawk said:

You know, Conder, I never even thought of that! :facepalm:  I bet you're absolutely correct!

The 1950-D nickel is an odd duck. It was very hard to find for a lonnnnnnng time, but now they seem to be everywhere at pretty affordable prices. They have absolutely come way down in price. What’s unusual is finding a well worn example. Most are AU/MS range. A well hoarded date that people got tired of holding onto. When I get to auctions with blue Whitman folders for nickels, I check out some of the tougher dates. Usually they are pretty nice.

Edited by VKurtB
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So... I agree with the group that your coin is a common wheat cent. It is not particularly valuable.  I find about 5-10 in every box ($25) of cents I hunt.  

However, I never speak disparagingly about a wheat cent I find in change; of any date.  They are fun finds in circulation, and are a good start to a Whitman folder.  I have a jar on my desk that probably has 2500-3000 wheat cents in it.  Like others said, common "late dates" are probably only with 3 cents each... but, I would absolutely keep it.

It's a fun game for me.

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On 11/14/2021 at 4:39 PM, Mohawk said:

If you are watching coin videos on YouTube, stop immediately.  They are full of blatant lies and worthless, deceptive misinformation.  

I think who @Mohawk is talking about (Keep me honest Mohawk) is YouTuber personality-type people who promote "hot finds", "coin tips" and "Coin Collector?  Never Do This!" - click bait type stuff.

There are many good videos on YouTube.  CoinWeek, PCGS, EAC, ANA... etc. have some nice videos.  If you stick to the credible sources, your information will be much more solid.    

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On 11/18/2021 at 5:51 PM, The Neophyte Numismatist said:

I think who @Mohawk is talking about (Keep me honest Mohawk) is YouTuber personality-type people who promote "hot finds", "coin tips" and "Coin Collector?  Never Do This!" - click bait type stuff.

There are many good videos on YouTube.  CoinWeek, PCGS, EAC, ANA... etc. have some nice videos.  If you stick to the credible sources, your information will be much more solid.    

True, but the credible sources also publish on their own sites. You can pretty safely swear off YouTube. 

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On 11/18/2021 at 6:51 PM, The Neophyte Numismatist said:

I think who @Mohawk is talking about (Keep me honest Mohawk) is YouTuber personality-type people who promote "hot finds", "coin tips" and "Coin Collector?  Never Do This!" - click bait type stuff.

There are many good videos on YouTube.  CoinWeek, PCGS, EAC, ANA... etc. have some nice videos.  If you stick to the credible sources, your information will be much more solid.    

You're right Neo....that is one of the offenders I am referring to.  There are several others.  But you are right.  CoinWeek, PCGS, EAC and ANA do post YouTube videos and those are just fine.  Sometimes I get so stuck on the sewage on there, I forget that reputable numismatic organizations post videos, too, and those videos are good.  But as Kurt said, you can view those videos on the websites of the reputable organizations involved.  Which is the course of action I would recommend for newbies for sure.  Much less confusing.

Edited by Mohawk
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On 11/18/2021 at 7:10 PM, VKurtB said:

True, but the credible sources also publish on their own sites. You can pretty safely swear off YouTube. 

And I agree with this not just 100% but 200%.  

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