Selling a coin vs NGC pricing guidelines
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I would like to know: What price, on average, can I expect to sell a coin to a coin collector, based on the NGC pricing guideline. For example, one can expect to sell a coin to another collector at a X% discount of what the NGC pricing guideline shows as the sell price.

Thank you.

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Welcome to the forum, unfortunately there is no perfect ratio or formula that can be applied to set coin prices.    Each coin is weighed on its own merits and faults by the market.   You have to do some research and see where the market is for each coin at this point in time.   You did not say but from your comment I am assuming that you are looking to sell some NGC graded coins not raw coins.   I suggest that you start by looking at the NGC coin explorer to see recent auction prices for the coins you have to sell in each grade, I use this to set the low retail price.   Then look at ebay sold listings (its very important to look at the sold listings not the current asking prices as those can be wildly different), those sold prices are how I set the high retail price.   If you have any coins that are CAC approved you can also look at the CAC website for their price guideline and compare that with your other research.

Now you have the information to set a basic bell curve price guidelines for yourself, next you have to decide if your coins fall in the upper portion of that curve or the lower and set your asking prices accordingly.    Provide good photos so that people can see what you have to sell and your ready; best of luck with the coins you want to sell.

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Thank you Coinbuf for your explanation. I have no experience dealing with coins. I have a collection that I put together as a child. I am now old and it’s time to get rid of it. The coins I have to sell are raw coins. 

Let me start by saying I misspoke my question. What I need to know is a BALLPARK value of the coins I have. I realize that what they are sold for is quite different than the “proposed” value…but you have to start somewhere. As part of my research, I  need to find someone who is knowledgeable that I can trust who is familiar with the field of purchasing and selling coins.
To that end and as part of my research I was hoping to use the GNC pricing as a jumping off point. The NGC pricing guideline, from my understanding, sets a general value on their website based on SALES of a coin with an established grading from a multitude of coin dealers. What I need to know is: If a coin (let’s say a dime) with a grading of fine is valued by the NGC pricing guideline for $56, what is the maximum value a coin dealer would have paid for an identically graded dime that thereafter sold for the GNC pricing guideline of $56?

 I would expect that there is some wholesale price that dealers are willing to pay and not go above. For example, a general guideline of no more than 70% of the GNC pricing guideline. That is the type of guidance I need.

Thank you.

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Welcome to the Forum Fishstick..Personally I try to only purchase a coin at 30 to 40% of the guideline price whenever possible most of the prices are already high so I would only want to pay $18 for your $56 dime. That is just how I look at the prices when I go hunting. Not sure if that helps you to get a idea. I am not a dealer that is just how I look at coins, and I can wait until I find the right deal . .... Well most of the time   lol  LoL It depends on the coin .

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On 11/14/2021 at 1:00 PM, Fishstick said:

Thank you Coinbuf for your explanation. I have no experience dealing with coins. I have a collection that I put together as a child. I am now old and it’s time to get rid of it. The coins I have to sell are raw coins. 

Let me start by saying I misspoke my question. What I need to know is a BALLPARK value of the coins I have. I realize that what they are sold for is quite different than the “proposed” value…but you have to start somewhere. As part of my research, I  need to find someone who is knowledgeable that I can trust who is familiar with the field of purchasing and selling coins.
To that end and as part of my research I was hoping to use the GNC pricing as a jumping off point. The NGC pricing guideline, from my understanding, sets a general value on their website based on SALES of a coin with an established grading from a multitude of coin dealers. What I need to know is: If a coin (let’s say a dime) with a grading of fine is valued by the NGC pricing guideline for $56, what is the maximum value a coin dealer would have paid for an identically graded dime that thereafter sold for the GNC pricing guideline of $56?

 I would expect that there is some wholesale price that dealers are willing to pay and not go above. For example, a general guideline of no more than 70% of the GNC pricing guideline. That is the type of guidance I need.

Thank you.

Thank you for that extra info and clarification on what you are looking to liquidate.   Using the NGC guide is not going to be super helpful for raw coins because for the most part the guide takes into account the cost of having the coins certified.   As an example a raw common date Morgan dollar in low uncirculated condition in todays market is selling around $40 each, because it costs $40+ to have each coin graded and slabbed the going rate for a generic date and grade is roughly $75-$95 for graded coins.   The problem again is that this ratio changes as the rarity and value of the coin goes up so its not really possible to use a straight ratio, its just not a one size fits all type of problem.

My suggestion to you is first determine the grade of each coin you have.   That sounds simple but can be challenging to non collectors, I find that for most a visual guide is the easiest way to judge the grade of your coin.    For this I recommend Photograde, take one coin and compare it to the different grades on the app until you find one that as closely as possible matches your coin.    Second use the redbook (available at most public libraries) to determine which coins are very common vs those that are more rare.   In the redbook you will find the mintages for each coin and a value for each coin (biased on your grade assessment) at the time the book was printed.    That will allow you to get a feel for the overall value, then you can go to ebay and as was suggested before you can search the sold listings for your coin and grade to see what the retail market is at this time.   Please be critical with the coins do not over grade and identify any coins that are damaged (bent, holed, or severely scraped or gouged) as those problems will reduce the value of the coins, sometimes by quite a bit.

All this will take some time and effort on your part and if you decide that you would rather skip all that then I suggest you find a local coin shop (or two if possible) and see what those shops would offer you for your coins.   While this option will be much quicker you should expect to receive much less then you would by selling yourself 50-60% less on average.   A better option might be to see if there are any coin clubs in your area, often times you can get help there from other collectors and it may in turn provide you an opportunity to find some potential buyers.

Unfortunately selling coins does require some upfront research but if you take your time stay organized and be honest and critical in your grade assessments you should have no problems getting through it.   We are happy to help if you have any questions or to provide some assessments on any coins that you are just not sure about, if you post some clear in focus photos we can usually get you in the ballpark grade wise and determine if there are any issues with the coin.

I wish it was as simple as if this do that, but it really is not most of the time.  Best of luck.

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Thank you Coinbuf and J P. Coinbuf, I understand all your guidance and will follow through on each step. I didn’t drag these coin around with me for the last fifty years to take any short cuts( ha ha). 
 

I do have one coin that I am totally stumped on. It is a mint error. I’ve attached a picture of the front and back of the penny. If you could give me some idea of it’s value that would be great. Also, your opinion as to weather or not it’s worth enough to have it graded by GNC. 
Again, many thanks.

92BEA1CB-8567-45C9-9218-C2624FD2A19F.jpeg

8DB5B351-67D1-4D78-9E24-CE1C1D35F7C1.jpeg

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To answer the OP's question, in my experience, EVERYTHING depends on when, where, and how you hope to sell. Location matters more than you can probably imagine. I lived my first 65 years in the eastern half of southern Pennsylvania (a rectangle that starts south of Gettysburg, runs halfway up the state to the north, then a hard right to the Delaware River, lop off Philly and its 'burbs, and back to the Maryland line and swing west the origin).

That area is UTTERLY AWASH in collectors and seriously good to great fresh material that hasn't been seen in DECADES, and it sells by the metaphorical truckload at in-person auctions. There is SO MUCH material there it actually depresses prices a WHOLE BUNCH. The old collectors are dying off and their collections are being sold. There is mucho seriously great material almost swimming around there. Enough to keep NGC busy for decades.

There are other places that are in-person auction "wastelands", like Northern Alabama, where I am now. The market value (local) of my stuff probably raised 20-25% just moving here. But expected buy/sell spreads here are an obscenity compared with PA. Too many people digging up rocks (it's a great geology area) or Civil War ammo, I guess. Maybe a dinosaur bone or two also. Coin wise, I notice a surplus of O mint Seated stuff and enough Nazi Germany material to cause one to go "Hmmm". Nice British stuff and some lower "bullion level" gold too.

I could get more specific if I knew what, how and where and maybe even when you want to sell. Between a buyer and a seller, he who has the luxury of waiting usually "wins".

BTW, everyone here is right about damaged 1952-D cent. Not an error, just damage.

Edited by VKurtB
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I get the Greysheet free every quarter at the local coin shows and watch the "Sold" prices on Ebay.  Sure, that's not always consistent due to the level of activity there but gives a fairly decent idea of what people are paying.  I can't go by the inflated NGC or PCGS price guides.  I do look at them still and compare everything but don't think there is a specific percentage one can deduct.  I found a coin or two that could actually use an update to price to upside.  With NGC too (leaving out the + and * in the grades) you one value listed for XF and below so in the case of VF (20, 25, 30, 35) what's listed there really doesn't represent VF accurately.  Just saying for the mid & low grades.

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