Grading?
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17 posts in this topic

I’ve been wanting to find a coin worth sending in for grading. I obviously don’t want to send something worth less then what the price of grading it is. Because there’s so many factors in the grading process I don’t know exactly what one of them coins would have to look like other then nicer then maybe one I’ve already seen slabbed but even that’s confusing because I wouldn’t grade some of those coins that I’ve seen them graded at but I’m no expert so my opinion on that is very little. I’m posting 3 nickels that I’ve found in the past couple months. Would anyone of you send any of these in if you had them in your collection? Are they worth a shot at a good grade and put in a slab or are they just blah in the coin collecting world?

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Those are very nice Nickels. I find there are so many coins out there all ready graded 64,65 and 66 that I can buy for way below the cost of sending a coin out to be graded most of the time. If you have a coin that is something special to you then by all means send it out to be graded but just for a basic collection I would just shop around for deals.;)  

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LemE could advise best. The general rule of thumb here is if it is worth $150 then worth it. I just am sending in a 2021 Morgan Cc, a 2021 Peace P, an 1887 Morgan potential Vam, a1998 ASE P proof, total cost $171, so in this case well within that window. Hoping for 70son the 2021s but not as flashy as many mintages. Only 175,000 of the CC and Peace were minted so I wanted them graded plus determined with the help of a bunch of guys here, the 1887 Morgan appears to be a VAM variety. So fingers crossed 🤞 

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On 11/6/2021 at 11:03 AM, Mr.Bill347 said:

Anyone need av1943 war nickel it’s an extra.

 

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Place it back in circulation and I’ll find it later thanks👍🏻 Lol no but really I got enough war nickels. I’m after the fake one but really wouldn’t mind finding one. What I'd really like to find is that 6th die nickel that hasn’t been discovered yet if it’s even a different year and not a duplicate from one of the other five. Just for kicks I weigh every nickel from 38 to 54 regardless if it’s got a mint mark or not. Which brings me to more questions about the Hennings nickel that I’d like someone in here that’s familiar with it. Like I know he didn’t ad the mint mark at the top of Monticello which is what got him caught but did any of his nickels from the five dies he had have a mint mark at all to the right of Monticello? Did he make these dies or obtain them somehow from the mint that’s why they were all older years or is that still in question on how he got them? Sorry if these sound like stupid questions knowing the story is out there for me to look up again. I think when I read about it it was a very short article and there wasn’t much to go off from.

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To me, "worth it" would mean that I feel confident that the coin will receive a grade that will mean the coin, slabbed, is worth as much more than unslabbed as it costs to have it graded (the value added of it being graded is at least as much as it costs to have it graded).  I have a complete set of Jefferson nickels in mint state, and I'm not even vaguely tempted to get any graded (besides, I like having them in the album).

I have never sent a coin in for grading, but I have an extra set of 2021 Morgans/Peace dollars, which, if it graded at MS70, would sell for a lot more than ungraded, so I may send all my 2021 Morgans/Peace dollars in for grading.  But that's what it would take for it to be "worth it" to me.

Mark

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On 11/6/2021 at 8:30 AM, Keith Dee said:

I’ve been wanting to find a coin worth sending in for grading.

I read this a lot. My question is, “Why?”  Nobody ever has an answer.

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On 11/6/2021 at 5:35 PM, VKurtB said:

I read this a lot. My question is, “Why?”  Nobody ever has an answer.

Lol I’m not sure. I guess I’d like to know I have something in my collection worthy of putting up for auction someday. Right now all I have in my collection anyone can obtain. I’m glad I’m not the only one since you’ve herd this a lot. Not sure of their reasoning but mine is more pride in owner ship of something I can display. My nephew may decide he wants to sell it some day to hopefully but the money to good use. It being graded would make that process easier🤷🏼‍♂️

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On 11/6/2021 at 8:36 PM, Keith Dee said:

Lol I’m not sure. I guess I’d like to know I have something in my collection worthy of putting up for auction someday. Right now all I have in my collection anyone can obtain. I’m glad I’m not the only one since you’ve herd this a lot. Not sure of their reasoning but mine is more pride in owner ship of something I can display. My nephew may decide he wants to sell it some day to hopefully but the money to good use. It being graded would make that process easier🤷🏼‍♂️

If it's about the money, use the money to buy a whole bunch of really nice uncirculated nickels. Those would end up being worth more to your nephew than a single nickel on which $30-60 was spent just to have it come back perhaps with a details grade.

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On 11/7/2021 at 10:56 AM, RWB said:

VKurtB's comment/question reaches to the core of behavior by inexperienced people in any endeavor. The easiest explanation to understand is "emulation." Mass hysteria media (aka "social media") promotes acceptance by emulation of public examples. Novices read examples of common-appearing (to them)  "graded coins" worth hundreds or thousands of dollars and quickly make the false connection that "grading = value." Thus, they seek to imitate - a very natural human and primate behavior. To a novice the slabbed MS-65 and the raw 1940 are "the same" except for grading, thus, if grading is imitated the 1940 nickel will be worth more just like the "same" MS-65.

Humans do this with almost everything we encounter - it is not specific to coins, stamps, bottle caps or land. The "greener pastures" are not caused by the fence, but by the fertilizer of knowledge.

Not trying to put words into your mouth, but are you saying that beginners are substituting the act of having a coin graded with its antecedent act, i.e. knowing how to grade and obtaining a coin worth professional grading? That makes a lot of sense to me. It is the ultimate “putting the cart before the horse” scenario. Since waaaaay below 1% of my coins are in plastic, I am not afflicted with the malady. Of course, collecting for over 25 years before third party grading even existed may have also played a role.

Edited by VKurtB
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45 P looks circulated to me.  And a good reason to submit for newbies is learning to grade from the coin you send.  Example 69-D nickel comes back MS 66 It gives him an example to go by Wont cost much and check the charts to see about FS coins.  You have to start somewhere.

 

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There are tons of reasons collectors do things that have nothing to do with economics. From my notes:

10 Reasons To Grade or Not to Grade:

1.) For the novelty. The quality of being new, original, or unusual.

2.) The coin is special for a number of reasons including sentimental reasons.

3.) Possible high grade.

4.) Registry Set.

5.) Anticipation of what the grade will be is fun.

6.) Authentication.

7.) Preserve and Protect.

8.) Test grading skills against TPG.

9.) Insurance purposes.

10.) Easier resale. Liquidity.

-Mod

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