What Did You Get: ANA Show Purchases / Auction Wins?
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14 posts in this topic

I had those on my watch list, very cool you got those!

Yep, I sold a few and was not disappointed.  Just nothing that was floating my boat to buy though.  Sadly some of the best Albanian coins were the ones I was selling :D . And they were my dupes.  

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On 8/23/2021 at 8:17 PM, gmarguli said:

 

I didn't attend the show, but based on what dealers are saying, coins were on fire and even old inventory was moving. Auctions were bringing crazy money for a lot of stuff. It's clear that there is so much money just waiting to be invested that even so-so investment grade stuff is bringing crazy prices. 

Quite a few coins I had bid on and lost 10-15 years ago came up for sale with the disbursement of a collection. I had the distinct pleasure of getting outbid on them again this year! :boo: However, this time they were selling for 2X-4X times what they sold for prior. 15 years ago I couldn't afford them. Today, I can't justify the prices. Guess I'll just live without them. :(

Only thing of interest I snagged was from a Stacks auction, an excessively rare (possibly unique) set of 1926 Greenland specimens / proofs / presentation pieces. Neither Stacks nor the consignor could find any record of another example existing. From what I gleaned while talking to the consignor, this set has been off the market for a very long time. Given their rarity and this crazy market, I expected them to sell for much more than they did.  

42544025.thumb.jpg.7a4223a48c6e45b5f4552ecba4270b73.jpg

GREENLAND. Krone, 1926-HCN GJ. Copenhagen Mint. PCGS SPECIMEN-67 Gold Shield.
KM-8. Virtually perfect, this EXTREMELY RARE presentation striking presents razor-sharp designs and fields that showcase alluring gleam due to fine vertical die polish lines. As the only example to have been certified, and the only example we have seen, a potentially singular opportunity to acquire this potentially previously unrecorded issue.

 

42544026.thumb.jpg.ff12b28c5039feb7ffa82fc0593991ac.jpg

GREENLAND. 50 Ore, 1926-HCN GJ. Copenhagen Mint. PCGS SPECIMEN-66 Gold Shield.
KM-7. Struck in aluminum-bronze like the Krone, this issue possesses similar radiance and charm with perhaps slightly more vivid tone. Similar to the Krone as well, this is the only example we have recorded, making it an important item for the collector intrigued by elusive 20th century presentation issues.

 

42544027.thumb.jpg.d10e93edfaebad436d81aaa2998fcb52.jpg

GREENLAND. 25 Ore, 1926-HCN GJ. Copenhagen Mint. PCGS SPECIMEN-66 Gold Shield.
KM-5. Variety without central hole. Identical quality to the previous lot, only struck in silver-colored copper-nickel alloy rather than the golden-hued aluminum-bronze of the Krone and 50 Ore denominations. Considering its obvious RARITY (this is the only example we can locate), and the technical superiority in which it was produced, an item that should resonate with the collector of 20th centuries rarities.

 

 

Very nice pickups gmarguli!! I've always liked those Greenland pieces.....they have a great look and your examples are extremely beautiful.  Thank you for sharing those with us!

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On 8/23/2021 at 6:55 PM, Jason Abshier said:

@gmarguli I have a question is a specimen graded coin the same as a pattern graded coin ? 

No.

A pattern is basically a coin of a new design that may or may not have been adopted later. It could also be related to the metal it is struck on, for example the 1974 aluminum Lincoln cent.

Specimen is the term being used for coins that are not normal circulation strikes, but also not traditional proofs. A mint may strike a few coins at higher pressure on polished blanks in order to present to government officials. Or they may take special care in grabbing a few early struck examples for record purposes. Or the coin could be an actual proof, but no record of proofs were kept, so the TPG are calling them specimen instead. And admittedly, in some cases the coin may just be a normal circulation strike, but it exhibits characteristics so outside normal examples (such as squared rims, fully PL surfaces, cameo contrast, etc) that the TPG want to give it a special designation to set it apart. 

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On 8/23/2021 at 8:17 PM, gmarguli said:

 

I didn't attend the show, but based on what dealers are saying, coins were on fire and even old inventory was moving. Auctions were bringing crazy money for a lot of stuff. It's clear that there is so much money just waiting to be invested that even so-so investment grade stuff is bringing crazy prices. 

Quite a few coins I had bid on and lost 10-15 years ago came up for sale with the disbursement of a collection. I had the distinct pleasure of getting outbid on them again this year! :boo: However, this time they were selling for 2X-4X times what they sold for prior. 15 years ago I couldn't afford them. Today, I can't justify the prices. Guess I'll just live without them. :(

Only thing of interest I snagged was from a Stacks auction, an excessively rare (possibly unique) set of 1926 Greenland specimens / proofs / presentation pieces. Neither Stacks nor the consignor could find any record of another example existing. From what I gleaned while talking to the consignor, this set has been off the market for a very long time. Given their rarity and this crazy market, I expected them to sell for much more than they did.  

42544025.thumb.jpg.7a4223a48c6e45b5f4552ecba4270b73.jpg

GREENLAND. Krone, 1926-HCN GJ. Copenhagen Mint. PCGS SPECIMEN-67 Gold Shield.
KM-8. Virtually perfect, this EXTREMELY RARE presentation striking presents razor-sharp designs and fields that showcase alluring gleam due to fine vertical die polish lines. As the only example to have been certified, and the only example we have seen, a potentially singular opportunity to acquire this potentially previously unrecorded issue.

 

42544026.thumb.jpg.ff12b28c5039feb7ffa82fc0593991ac.jpg

GREENLAND. 50 Ore, 1926-HCN GJ. Copenhagen Mint. PCGS SPECIMEN-66 Gold Shield.
KM-7. Struck in aluminum-bronze like the Krone, this issue possesses similar radiance and charm with perhaps slightly more vivid tone. Similar to the Krone as well, this is the only example we have recorded, making it an important item for the collector intrigued by elusive 20th century presentation issues.

 

42544027.thumb.jpg.d10e93edfaebad436d81aaa2998fcb52.jpg

GREENLAND. 25 Ore, 1926-HCN GJ. Copenhagen Mint. PCGS SPECIMEN-66 Gold Shield.
KM-5. Variety without central hole. Identical quality to the previous lot, only struck in silver-colored copper-nickel alloy rather than the golden-hued aluminum-bronze of the Krone and 50 Ore denominations. Considering its obvious RARITY (this is the only example we can locate), and the technical superiority in which it was produced, an item that should resonate with the collector of 20th centuries rarities.

 

 

glad that u won those three...usually we r competitors in certain areas at the better auctions...i did look at those three in person while at the ana n had previously thought id make an attempt to add them to my collection, but decided to pass on them...at least i know where they now reside....for their listing they sold very reasonable....

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@gmargulithanks for explaining that to me . I don’t collect specimen or pattern pieces or off struck metal pieces (they sure are unique and interesting) but over the years I was always confused by the three but learned they are category of their own … On few other coin forums some collectors said they are same thing makes it confusing …I figure they weren’t nothing the same otherwise the grading company wouldn’t be grading them like that 

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On 8/23/2021 at 9:55 PM, Jason Abshier said:

@gmarguli I have a question is a specimen graded coin the same as a pattern graded coin ? 

A grade is a grade is a grade. Does not matter the category.

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On 8/24/2021 at 2:57 PM, RWB said:

A grade is a grade is a grade. Does not matter the category.

@RWBI fully agree , what I should of said is how the grading company determines and authenticates pattern pieces VS Specimen pieces regardless of giving it a graded point . Authentication is the more important part not the grade points 

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On 8/25/2021 at 11:49 AM, Jason Abshier said:

@RWBI fully agree , what I should of said is how the grading company determines and authenticates pattern pieces VS Specimen pieces regardless of giving it a graded point . Authentication is the more important part not the grade points 

This is a point of contention between some (me) and the TPGs. To call any coin a "specimen" requires proof that the piece was made for some special purpose or in some clearly modified manner - that is my view. This places terms such as "specimen" or "branch mint proof" in the category requiring extraordinary evidence for an extraordinary claim. Pattern pieces differ in that they are generally well understood and documented, even though many of those cataloged as "patterns" are really novodels, mules and routine testing pieces. I feel that in EVERY instance a claim of "specimen" must include publicly disclosed objective criteria.

To be blunt: no coin can be determined to be a "specimen" "branch mint proof" or other specially made piece merely by casual examination.

Some TPGs seem unable to do this and even when they publish information, their data and analysis are faulty. That kind of lazy, sloppy research makes all of their authentications open to question, and degrades the TPG's attribution authority.

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