Tetradramma di Akragas in asta
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8 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Hello, not knowing English, I support myself with Google translator,

For fans of ancient Greek coins, I was asking what you think of the tetradrachm of Akragas, in Lansky auction of June 10, 2021, lot #04/22.

Maybe I would like to know what you think, some experts in the field

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My opinion, that this is a modern forgery.

Thanks to those who wish to comment.

Gionnysicily.

 

Edited by gionnysicily
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It doesn't look right to me, though I'm not very familiar with the specific coinages of Agrigentum (and am not an expert in any field of numismatics). What concerns me is that the detail is just a little too perfectly detailed for ancient mintage.

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Posted (edited)

Pensavo che in questo forum ci fossero esperti qualificati per le monete antiche, soprattutto della Sicilia greca.
La mia opinione che si tratti di un falso moderno, è supportata dai confronti che ho analizzato. Vedi foto sotto, un confronto con un tetradramma di Akragas, sicuramente autentico, dal libro di Hirmer.

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Edited by gionnysicily
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5 hours ago, gionnysicily said:

I thought that in this forum, there are qualified experts for ancient coins, especially of Greek Sicily.
My opinion that it is a modern forgery, is supported by the comparisons I have analyzed. See photo below, a comparison with a tetradrachm of Akragas, definitely authentic, from the Hirmer book.

 

There might well be some qualified experts. However, in case none of them happened to offer an answer, I figured I'd try and be of some assistance. I would definitely agree that the tail of the reference photo differs radically from the example you offer, and that other details are off. Most of the Akragas tets on Wildwinds, where you have surely looked, are more worn than the catalog example. I think it's at least very questionable, so I agree with you to the extent my understanding permits me to do without going beyond my knowledge.

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The analysis I did, is not just with the tetradrachm on Hirmer, the photo below, comparison with a tetradrachm in Boston. In addition to the eagle's tail, it shows the lack of the end of the hare's hind legs.Plus fractures on the edges, typical of a coin minted with a hydraulic press and not hammered. 

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To sell a fake for 110,000 Euros, shows that there are collectors who do not study what an ancient coin is.
Incredible.

And she wouldn't be the only one.

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I don't see any signs that it's certified by a reputable grading service with solid expertise in ancient Greek coinage. Only a fool would spend that kind of money on an uncertified coin in this day and age. Sensible collectors would say "vaffanculo" simply for that reason.

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