1976-D Bicentennial quarter Struck on a Dime Stock
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I'm feeling this is right, never knew anything about these. Pretty cool and interesting. I put a dime and quarter together to see the thinness. And the weight is about right I think. 

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Weight should be about 1/3 heavier than a dime and less than a quarter. If there are no signs of abuse or acid treatment, it might be worth having it authenticated by the hosts.

(PS: The coin surfaces look suspiciously like they have been treated with acid. Also, the design details should be weaker.)

Edited by RWB
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11 hours ago, RWB said:

Weight should be about 1/3 heavier than a dime and less than a quarter. If there are no signs of abuse or acid treatment, it might be worth having it authenticated by the hosts.

(PS: The coin surfaces look suspiciously like they have been treated with acid. Also, the design details should be weaker.)

It was soaked in a corrosive and then wiped/scraped, removing a significant amount of metal. Otherwise it's a normal US quarter dollar coin.

A quarter struck on a dime planchet could never have full rims all the way around. There's not enough metal in a dime blank to expand that far and be forced up into a rim, all the way around the edge of the coin.

The pictured 1976 quarter had full normal rims before it was altered.

Definitely not one to send in for authentication(!)

 

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3 minutes ago, ProfHaroldHill said:

It was soaked in a corrosive and then wiped/scraped, removing a significant amount of metal. Otherwise it's a normal US quarter dollar coin.

A quarter struck on a dime planchet could never have full rims all the way around. There's not enough metal in a dime blank to expand that far and be forced up into a rim, all the way around the edge of the coin.

The pictured 1976 quarter had full normal rims before it was altered.

Definitely not one to send in for authentication(!)

 

I believe our OP is proposing a quarter sized blank was cut out of dime-thickness roll stock, still a pipe dream. The acid is the far more likely answer.

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2 minutes ago, VKurtB said:

I believe our OP is proposing a quarter sized blank was cut out of dime-thickness roll stock, still a pipe dream. The acid is the far more likely answer.

Didn't catch that part. The blanks proposed would not likely have survived the trip to the coinage dies.

The upsetting mill comes to mind first and foremost. The blanks would probably be seriously deformed, if they didn't jam in the mechanism on the way through.

I'm wondering if it's even possible to set up the blanking equipment that way without it being very obvious what was wrong, well before they would actually begin the blanking process.

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35 minutes ago, VKurtB said:

The acid is the far more likely answer.

I'd be curious to see the edge in clear focus, and to see the coin stacked on a normal quarter, for diameter comparison.

A lot of copper can be dissolved away where the copper layer is exposed directly.

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45 minutes ago, RWB said:

Thanks for correcting my muddled comment. Might be the excitement of finally getting a vaccine jab.

Well you're certainly right about the details. If this was actually manufactured as proposed/hoped by the OP, then it's an error coin that was given an acid bath and a scrub, judging from those surfaces!

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Sorry I was out helping family,  but was still reading on the thread. Didn't want to do or saying anything until I got back to my desk with a little research I pulled up. I'm going to have to buy another scale, this coin is bouncing back and forth from 3.91 to 3.96. I feel like I'm still in the tolerance of the weight. And its the same diameter of another quarter. I took a couple pics. Kurt seriously bud, another pipe dream . What dream pipe are you smoking,  whatever it is share the wealth. True , I do dream I feel if I can fulfill them I will. Don't know why you're being so harsh like that on newbies. To be honest with you, I don't set my goals so high were I can't reach them. Made that mistake a couple of times and I learned hard not to do that again. So back to the coin, I'm going to be in Denver Monday, I'm dropping off the coin to Anacs. So hopefully it all comes back well.

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On 2/26/2021 at 8:36 PM, ProfHaroldHill said:

Didn't catch that part. The blanks proposed would not likely have survived the trip to the coinage dies.

No quarters struck on dime stock do exist and they do not get seriously deformed in the upsetting mill.  Even if they did get a slight warp from the mill the strike would flatten that warp out again.

 

The coin appears etched to me.  One thing that is interesting is they used a corrosive that didn't attack the copper core at a greater rate than the coppernickel which is what usually happens.

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So I dropped this coin off at Anacs on March 3rd and  another  to be graded. This is my first time ever doing this, but thought I would give it a try. My question is does anyone know the process of updates or anything how stuff like this works. I'm not in no hurry or impatient just wondering how grading company's work. Thanks for any thoughts on this. And yes pretty excited on knowing what they will come back as.

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Using the Modwriter Scale For Damaged Coins,

The quarter would grade at U -70

Unsightly Negative 70

The higjest grade! Congratulations!😎

Edited by Modwriter
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On 3/2/2021 at 8:40 PM, Conder101 said:

No quarters struck on dime stock do exist and they do not get seriously deformed in the upsetting mill.  Even if they did get a slight warp from the mill the strike would flatten that warp out again.

 

The coin appears etched to me.  One thing that is interesting is they used a corrosive that didn't attack the copper core at a greater rate than the coppernickel which is what usually happens.

Thanks for the heads up, Conder101!

They sure do exist... in numbers! At the Denver Mint in 1970, it seems an entire coil of dime thickness stock was cut to quarter sized blanks by mistake and the error wasn't noticed(?)  The struck pieces, after successfully making it through the coinage process, were released into circulation. The source I read estimated over 100,000 of them were released.

@Hinkle, thanks for the new/better pics. I'm rarely able to go online these days, big workload outside now until late June, or I would have replied sooner after your new pics went up.

After reading up on these errors after Conder's post, and seeing your new and much better pics, I think you were wise to send the coin in. It may well be a damaged error coin, struck on a dime-thickness planchet as you estimate.

I'll be looking forward to hearing about what ANACS has to say.

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On 3/21/2021 at 8:28 PM, ProfHaroldHill said:

At the Denver Mint in 1970, it seems an entire coil of dime thickness stock was cut to quarter sized blanks by mistake

They also did a coil of quarter stock punched into dime blanks, but a lot fewer of those got out because the increase thickness compared to standard dimes caused a lot of jamming in equipment .

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Well everyone, it's not genuine. it came back acid treated. Man, thought I had a good one here. O well, better luck next time. I'm still loving the hobby and of course hunting to whatever I find. Here's the number they emailed me 7101012. The items are being shipped back to me starting today. This is a really good experience for me, to the means of being careful when finding unusual coin's. If it wasn't for you all I would be sitting duck on other coin's you have helped me with. I wouldn't know what I know today. You all are great, thanks for all advice you've gave me.

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I'm not knocking down grading company's, I have no reason for that. I point out anything that don't look right. Just for everyone to know if it's mint or grading error. But I feel I'm in the wrong for doing that, so in short words I'm just being honest. Now  people are doing liposuction on coin's to make them thin. I believe there's no chemical out there that will shrink a coin that thin without destroying the obverse and reverse very badly. I'm not disputing the fact that it's been acid treated/clean. But the coin on the other hand not genuine/fake. There's a 1970 d slabed and labeled struck on a dime stock/cleaned. The research I'm pulling up is there's no reason for anyone to make a not genuine/fake quarter. If that's the case then my research says I have a illegal coin in my possession. Which says there's no Numismatic value on not genuine/fake coin's. So it comes down to it's genuine or not genuine. Reason I'm saying this is because the grading company put a price value on the not genuine/fake coin. So I must have the first valued not genuine/fake coin out there. I apologize on alot that I'm saying because the research is right, but the grading company is not giving us info on there confirmation on the coin. So this way we all know what to look for incase this happens again. That should be our right to know. This should go viral threw the Numismatic for collectors to know there's fake quarters out there to be on the look out for. Idk I'm just saying. 

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9 minutes ago, Hinkle said:

grading company put a price value on the not genuine/fake coin. So I must have the first valued not genuine/fake coin out there.

How did you arrive at the conclusion that that ANACS put a value on your coin?  Also what leads you to think that you have the first?

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1 hour ago, Coinbuf said:

How did you arrive at the conclusion that that ANACS put a value on your coin?  Also what leads you to think that you have the first?

Idk, I must be doing my research wrong . Not finding anything that people are collecting not genuine/fake coin's. I have two documents saying differently and third is what you see on the web site when entering the cert#. One says acid treated and not genuine, and the other saying acid treated with a price value. I apologize but I'm confused. 

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The value you see on that piece of paper is just for the insurance when sending the coin back to you, I have not submitted to ANACS in a long time but I'm guessing it should be the value you supplied to ANACS when you filled out the form to submit these coins.   Grading companies do not place values on coins they only use your valuation to charge the appropriate insurance for shipping back to you.

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9 hours ago, Hinkle said:

 I believe there's no chemical out there that will shrink a coin that thin without destroying the obverse and reverse very badly.

Although it seems like acid would melt the design of the coin into an unrecognizable blob, the fact is that a coin completely submerged in (at least some) acids will have its fields "eaten away" at the same rate as the design and lettering, which has the effect of reducing the thickness and diameter, while leaving the design more or less intact. As Conder101 implied, clad coins are usually found with the copper core corroded at a faster rate than the clad layers, resulting in a coin with an edge that resembles a pulley. I would be interested to discover what chemical was used on this coin.

Hmmm - looks like a series of experiments may be in my future.

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15 minutes ago, Coinbuf said:

The value you see on that piece of paper is just for the insurance when sending the coin back to you, I have not submitted to ANACS in a long time but I'm guessing it should be the value you supplied to ANACS when you filled out the form to submit these coins.   Grading companies do not place values on coins they only use your valuation to charge the appropriate insurance for shipping back to you.

Thank you Coinbuf, I just need to be a little bit more careful and forsure sending anything in next time. I do understand this happens in the hobby but I'll keep moving forward in hunting and finding coin's. 

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5 minutes ago, Just Bob said:

Although it seems like acid would melt the design of the coin into an unrecognizable blob, the fact is that a coin completely submerged in (at least some) acids will have its fields "eaten away" at the same rate as the design and lettering, which has the effect of reducing the thickness and diameter, while leaving the design more or less intact. As Conder101 implied, clad coins are usually found with the copper core corroded at a faster rate than the clad layers, resulting in a coin with an edge that resembles a pulley. I would be interested to discover what chemical was used on this coin.

Hmmm - looks like a series of experiments may be in my future.

Right! Look like a series of experiments in the future for all of us lol.

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37 minutes ago, Just Bob said:

Although it seems like acid would melt the design of the coin into an unrecognizable blob, the fact is that a coin completely submerged in (at least some) acids will have its fields "eaten away" at the same rate as the design and lettering, which has the effect of reducing the thickness and diameter, while leaving the design more or less intact. As Conder101 implied, clad coins are usually found with the copper core corroded at a faster rate than the clad layers, resulting in a coin with an edge that resembles a pulley. I would be interested to discover what chemical was used on this coin.

Hmmm - looks like a series of experiments may be in my future.

If you fill a dish shallow enough that the clad layer only is in the acid I think you could achieve this result, flip over every so often until you have the desired effect.

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On 4/18/2021 at 12:13 PM, Hinkle said:

If that's the case then my research says I have a illegal coin in my possession.

The coin isn't illegal.  It has been altered, but doing so is only illegal if it is done with fraudulent intent.

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