2019 Dime errors
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26 posts in this topic

Hello,

I'm new here and I have a 2019 D dime that looks like it might be a good error coin. The collar is very high and the clad lines are perfect around the circumference. I found the coin in change one day. I have never seen anything like it. I do have a basic knowledge of imperfections and coin grades. I am looking for any insight I can get about this.

2019 dime back.JPG

2019 dime edge.JPG

2019 dime front.JPG

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Welcome to the forum.

Your coin is not a mint error. It is what is known as a "Dryer coin." The theory is that these are coins which have been caught between the inner and outer drums of a commercial dryer, and the pressure and movement wears and deforms the rim. This is also the look when a coin has been "spooned," or tapped repeatedly around the rim. (Spooning is the first step in making a ring from a coin.) Regardless, it was not done this way at the mint.

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You are the second person to tell me this today. Like I said, I got it in change and had never seen one deformed like that. I had done some research online today and couldn't find anything like this.

I would love to know that it's a rare find, but there aren't many people to ask where I live. Thank you for the information. Just out of curiosity, how do they get the edges that smooth?

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24 minutes ago, Greg Mahan said:

You are the second person to tell me this today. Like I said, I got it in change and had never seen one deformed like that. I had done some research online today and couldn't find anything like this.

I would love to know that it's a rare find, but there aren't many people to ask where I live. Thank you for the information. Just out of curiosity, how do they get the edges that smooth?

Also it may be a “spooned coin”.

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Thanks for the replies. Like I said, I got it in change and had never seen one like it. One could only hope it was valuable, but it's just my luck. I'd never heard of a spooned coin until today.

The person I spoke with mentioned quarters, but I can't see why a dime would be done that way. The fact that it was smaller in diameter to a regular dime was questionable to me. I grew up with the understanding that it was against the law to deface US currency in any form.

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There are a multitude of ways a coin can Become damaged after it leaves the mint, but only a limited number of ways an error can occur during the minting process.  

A planchet enters the die chamber and is struck by the dies.  A collar is used to keep the coin at the correct diameter and form the reeding on dimes, quarters and halves.  It is impossible for an in spec planchet to have a smaller diameter, thicker edge, and complete but distorted lettering next to the rim.  Can't happen, so that's why it's easy to tell its not a mint error.

As to what caused the damage?  Who knows?  A dryer coin has some characteristics that are similar, but maybe it was something else.  Unless you were there when it happened, you may never know.  But if you take the time and learn the minting process, you'll know that it didn't leave the mint like that

Here is a site to get you started

https://www.usmint.gov/news/inside-the-mint/how-coins-are-made-coin-production-terminology

Here is a good explanation of a dryer coin.  Make sure you click on they link listed at the end of the explanation.

http://www.error-ref.com/?s=Dryer+coin

Hope this helps

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2 minutes ago, Greg Mahan said:

I would still like to know how they smooth the edges and get rid of the reeds. 

Hammering the coin’s edges with a spoon.

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2 minutes ago, Oldhoopster said:

There are a multitude of ways a coin can Become damaged after it leaves the mint, but only a limited number of ways an error can occur during the minting process.  

A planchet enters the die chamber and is struck by the dies.  A collar is used to keep the coin at the correct diameter and form the reeding on dimes, quarters and halves.  It is impossible for an in spec planchet to have a smaller diameter, thicker edge, and complete but distorted lettering next to the rim.  Can't happen, so that's why it's easy to tell its not a mint error.

As to what caused the damage?  Who knows?  A dryer coin has some characteristics that are similar, but maybe it was something else.  Unless you were there when it happened, you may never know.  But if you take the time and learn the minting process, you'll know that it didn't leave the mint like that

Here is a site to get you started

https://www.usmint.gov/news/inside-the-mint/how-coins-are-made-coin-production-terminology

Here is a good explanation of a dryer coin.  Make sure you click on they link listed at the end of the explanation.

http://www.error-ref.com/?s=Dryer+coin

Hope this helps

Thank you. I do have a very basic knowledge, but have never seen anything like this. My Dad is more of a collector, but hasn't kept up lately. He was my first inquiry.

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5 minutes ago, VKurtB said:

Hammering the coin’s edges with a spoon.

Thanks for the education! But, who in the world would have that kind of patience? I have a welding background and understand metalurgy, but there ain't no way I'd have the patience to do that.

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1 minute ago, Greg Mahan said:

Thanks for the education! But, who in the world would have that kind of patience? I have a welding background and understand metalurgy, but there ain't no way I'd have the patience to do that.

That’s what makes them interesting. People literally hammer them into rings. Dimes might be toe rings. 

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1 minute ago, VKurtB said:

That’s what makes them interesting. People literally hammer them into rings. Dimes might be toe rings. 

Well, I've never understood toe rings! I almost can't stand flip flops! I can weld and grind on metal all day, but would have never thought of anything like that. I have a Masonic Brother that's almost 80 and he makes rings for young ladies out of dollar bills, but he doesn't deface them. He gives them as Christmas and graduation presents. It's a talent that I should learn. Pretty neat.

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15 hours ago, Greg Mahan said:

Well, I've never understood toe rings! I almost can't stand flip flops! I can weld and grind on metal all day, but would have never thought of anything like that. I have a Masonic Brother that's almost 80 and he makes rings for young ladies out of dollar bills, but he doesn't deface them. He gives them as Christmas and graduation presents. It's a talent that I should learn. Pretty neat.

I once had a girlfriend who liked toe rings. She was a “freak” in many ways.

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3 hours ago, VKurtB said:

I once had a girlfriend who liked toe rings. She was a “freak” in many ways.

I might have seen these on some girl in certain clubs i may or may not have been in.........hummmm

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19 hours ago, JT2 said:

I might have seen these on some girl in certain clubs i may or may not have been in.........hummmm

Then you’re reading me 5 by 5. 

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One story told to me first hand.  Who would have time?  Well according to my source prisoners had lots of time and conveniently spoons were the culinary choice of the prison system. I was told with a little thinking I might be able to figure out how the coins got inside and most facilities had some sort of repair shop (drill bit). Half’s and quarters were popular but dimes were too as they were made into children’s rings and toe rings. I was told about this in the 70’s when silver was still circulating. As the years pass silver still commands a premium 

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On 3/20/2022 at 3:19 PM, Dregon fuller said:

I found this dime I'm wondering if this is a mint/dye error if anyone knows anything please let me know

 

 

See your other post for answers.

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On 3/20/2022 at 6:19 PM, Dregon fuller said:

I found this dime I'm wondering if this is a mint/dye error if anyone knows anything please let me know

1647814705750280478180324736500.jpg

16478147249215662490198911940942.jpg

Just damaged after it left the mint. Theres all sorts of different things they come in contact with that turn them all sorts of colors. 

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On 4/18/2022 at 8:06 PM, Valerie Groves said:

My daughter has the same exact coin. It has to be an error. 2019 D wide extra smooth edge

 

 

Why does it "have to be" an error? Can you explain how it happened?

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On 4/18/2022 at 8:06 PM, Valerie Groves said:

My daughter has the same exact coin. It has to be an error. 2019 D wide extra smooth edge

1650330226260667103660842364432.jpg

16503302790165227121506158711199.jpg

Also consider that enough of these occur to receive a name for the cause (Dryer coins). These are quite common, and could be caused by several things, but they are all referred to as simply dryer coins. I assure you it is not an error. The only error is in the logic that if multiples exist it must be an error. 

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