It's Token Tuesday! Post 'em if you got 'em.
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313 posts in this topic

8 minutes ago, Fenntucky Mike said:

Onchan Internment Camp, located on the Isle of Man, considered the "best" camp for "enemy aliens" to be placed in amongst the several other camps located there. Onchan was one of the largest camps in terms of size and on the grounds were areas to plant gardens, keep fowl, play organized sports and to move around in general. The internees consisted largely of academics and artists (an unofficial pole of the camp in 1940 listed 121 artists and literary workers, 113 scientists and teachers, 89 engineers, 68 lawyers, 38 physicians, 19 clergymen and 12 dentists amongst the internees) as a result there were art exhibitions, lectures, college classes and a newspaper (The Onchan Pioneer). From June 1940 until July of 1941 the camp housed approximately 1,300 German and Austrian nationals, the camp was reopened in September of 1941 to house Italian internees until it's closure in November 1944. Three denominations of tokens circulated at the camp, 6p, 1p and the 1/2 penny.

1261649799_OchanInternmentCampTokenObvandRev.png.5fe6735d890bb24c6c5457fa2e52ceaa.png

Interesting for a number of reasons... I have seen coins from the Warsaw Ghetto stamped "Geto," but have never seen one marked "INTERNMENT CAMP," not even in the U.S. which had several at remote locations post-Pearl Harbor. I have also never seen a more curious theme, legs in flight!, for a coin used for a facility whose mission was to keep detainees securely interred, even if it appears on their national flag. 

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1 hour ago, Fenntucky Mike said:

Onchan Internment Camp, located on the Isle of Man, considered the "best" camp for "enemy aliens" to be placed in amongst the several other camps located there. Onchan was one of the largest camps in terms of size and on the grounds were areas to plant gardens, keep fowl, play organized sports and to move around in general. The internees consisted largely of academics and artists (an unofficial pole of the camp in 1940 listed 121 artists and literary workers, 113 scientists and teachers, 89 engineers, 68 lawyers, 38 physicians, 19 clergymen and 12 dentists amongst the internees) as a result there were art exhibitions, lectures, college classes and a newspaper (The Onchan Pioneer). From June 1940 until July of 1941 the camp housed approximately 1,300 German and Austrian nationals, the camp was reopened in September of 1941 to house Italian internees until it's closure in November 1944. Three denominations of tokens circulated at the camp, 6p, 1p and the 1/2 penny.

1261649799_OchanInternmentCampTokenObvandRev.png.5fe6735d890bb24c6c5457fa2e52ceaa.png

Fascinating. Thanks for sharing. I learned a few things for sure. 

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10 hours ago, Quintus Arrius said:

I have also never seen a more curious theme, legs in flight!, for a coin used for a facility whose mission was to keep detainees securely interred, even if it appears on their national flag.

The triskelion is typically accompanied by the legend/motto Quocunque Jeceris Stabit, roughly translated, "Whithersoever You Throw It, It Will Stand". But an interesting interpretation of the triskelion, by you, considering where it was used. On an internment camp token. I like it. (thumbsu

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Picked this one up a few weeks ago shortly after I posted the .10 & .25 cent tokens, funny how that works sometimes. Now I'm only missing the .01 and .50 cent issues for this store. The color schemes are almost always the same .01 = black, .05 = green, .10 = blue, .25 = red and .50 = pink. In fact, I haven't seen any food stamp tokens in my region that didn't follow that color pattern. 

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Fleeting thought:  if production of the cent, with as little copper as it presently has, is expensive, maybe the Mint ought to consider bi-metallic as was done here.  Great set!

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@Mr_Spud  If you can resist the irresistible impulse to bathe your token in various liquids, why not consult the King of Tokens, our very own Just Bob as this is his area of expertise. Any inadviseable choice you make considering the composition of coin/token at issue may well be irreversible and the last thing you need is someone dismissing your possession with upturned nose as "cleaned."

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@Mr_Spud  if it is not an imposition, I am sure those of us who have followed this thread would be curious as to its outcome.  We have the "before" photos; now all we need are the "after" shots... if you are pleased with the results, and are so inclined. Much obliged! And a special mention of Just Bob's good-natured cooperation!

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On 7/31/2021 at 11:07 PM, Mr_Spud said:

Ok, but I might let it soak in mineral oil for a very long time, but I’ll repost the before images along with some after images when it’s done 🌞

I think we'd all be interested in the outcome.

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On 7/31/2021 at 11:07 PM, Mr_Spud said:

Ok, but I might let it soak in mineral oil for a very long time, but I’ll repost the before images along with some after images when it’s done 🌞

My friend, all we have is time and the best things in life are well worth waiting for.  Besides, don't we all have an innate desire to find out how things turned out?

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This is a cool thread.....I don't have a single token to share, but I've enjoyed seeing the ones posted.  Thanks for sharing those everyone!

Edited by Mohawk
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It took wiping my laptop and reloading Windows, but I finally got it to communicate with my phone again, so I can resume loading pictures and posting here.

The Beverly Drive-In was opened in 1948, with one screen and an 800 car capacity. It had a miniature golf course out front. The owner and his family lived in a house under the screen. A second screen was added in 1979. The owner passed away in 1987, and the theater closed. It was reopened in 2001, and remained open until it was heavily damaged by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. It burned down in 2010.

I spent quite a few nights watching movies at this theater, at first with my family, later with friends and dates. In my late teens, I owned a pickup with a camper shell on back. We would throw a mattress in the back, pull into the parking place with the rear of the truck facing the screen, lower the tailgate and raise the camper shell liftgate, and lie in the back and watch the movie.

 

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