It's Token Tuesday! Post 'em if you got 'em.
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313 posts in this topic

19 hours ago, Quintus Arrius said:

@Just Bob Just curious, where was the earliest token in Mississippi produced, for what, and in what year?

Three bars in Vicksburg - The Mansion House, Custis' Bar, and The Bar of the Shakespeare - issued paper Hard Times Satirical Notes in 1837, so these are the first pieces of exonumia listed in Rulau, which lists pieces chronologically. As for metal tokens, Benjamin Fotterall, seller of "silk, fancy, and staple goods of all kinds,"  and the Prentiss House hotel, both of Vicksburg, began issuing tokens in the early 1850s. Both listings say, "Approx 1852." I don't own a Prentiss House token, in fact have never even seen a picture of one. I do own Fotterall tokens in copper and bronze. The Prentiss House token is a $1.00 issue; the Fotterall tokens are advertising tokens, and have no face value on them.

 

 

 

 

 

As a addendum to my last post:

I had to go to Poplarville this afternoon, so I stopped by the city cemetery, and took these photos of Randolph Batson's grave:

 

 

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Sidings, Mississippi was established in 1889. The name was changed to Meehan Junction in 1902, and to Meehan in 1950. A local story says that the area was once Choctaw "Holy Land."

The Acme Lumber company operated a yellow pine/ hardwood mill in the 1890s that produced 60,000 board feet of lumber per day.

Chatham's Mississippi Token book lists a 50 cent and 10 cent token - both unique. Trantow's Lumber Company token book has the same information. The 25 cent token that I have, which, from its appearance, was found by a metal detector, is unlisted. I purchased it in 2009, and have not seen another one for sale before or since. It is possible that it is unique, or a least very rare.

 

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11 hours ago, ronnie stein said:

The few towns that I know of that are named 'Sidings' are next to a railroad siding. (pass). They usually stay as small towns. I guess that Sidings grew into a Junction. ---- I hope your token is unique, Just Bob.

When I was researching that token, I ran across a picture of the actual siding for which the town was named. It was just a picture of some railroad tracks side-by-side, with no buildings remaining, so I didn't bother to post it. :)

As for the token being unique: I appreciate the thought, and it may actually be one of only one or two known at the moment, but I have learned that it only takes one discovery of a small hoard to turn a rare token into a common one. I have had that happen on more than one occasion. Several tokens that I bought years ago, which were listed as rarity 9 or 10, and which I paid up for, are now considered common. I remember one in particular that was listed as unique. Then another example of it came up for auction. Then another, and another, then several more followed, until everyone who wanted one had bought one. Now, if one comes up for sale on Ebay or elsewhere, it usually remains unsold. What happened was that someone was digging in an old privy site, and found a bunch that had been dumped in there many years ago, after they had ceased being used. The finder was smart enough to offer them for sale one at a time, instead of dumping them on the market all at once, and was able to get good money for the first few that sold.

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16 minutes ago, Hoghead515 said:

. Found this cool one on Ebay. I bought it where I'm from KY. And I do lots of canning. Polish_20210525_130158357.thumb.jpg.79c1fc7732e18791df8f2f0c4c63c0cf.jpgPolish_20210525_130134436.jpg.f89654263baa79aefcdb0a0fb72b059c.jpg

They never specified the size of the bucket. So could I show up with a tractor bucket full? :devil:

Always hated peeling/canning tomatoes, then we got a Victorio Strainer and that was good, then I stuck a sprocket where the handle was and powered it with a stationary bike and that was better, finally found a small engine hm and stuck it on there, that was great! Mom hated the fumes, mess, noise, etc. so I had to go back to man power.:(

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49 minutes ago, Hoghead515 said:

. Found this cool one on Ebay. I bought it where I'm from KY. And I do lots of canning. Polish_20210525_130158357.thumb.jpg.79c1fc7732e18791df8f2f0c4c63c0cf.jpgPolish_20210525_130134436.jpg.f89654263baa79aefcdb0a0fb72b059c.jpg

thats cool, at first i thought it mite be hoghead himself pre-beard, but realized it is good ole dan'l boone himself, the guenther brothers founded blue grass canning co. circa 1895....great local history item...

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4 minutes ago, Fenntucky Mike said:

 

They never specified the size of the bucket. So could I show up with a tractor bucket full? :devil:

Always hated peeling/canning tomatoes, then we got a Victorio Strainer and that was good, then I stuck a sprocket where the handle was and powered it with a stationary bike and that was better, finally found a small engine hm and stuck it on there, that was great! Mom hated the fumes, mess, noise, etc. so I had to go back to man power.:(

It's a whole lot of work. 

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5 minutes ago, Fenntucky Mike said:

 

They never specified the size of the bucket. So could I show up with a tractor bucket full? :devil:

Always hated peeling/canning tomatoes, then we got a Victorio Strainer and that was good, then I stuck a sprocket where the handle was and powered it with a stationary bike and that was better, finally found a small engine hm and stuck it on there, that was great! Mom hated the fumes, mess, noise, etc. so I had to go back to man power.:(

what was ur carbon foot print?....

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Just now, zadok said:

thats cool, at first i thought it mite be hoghead himself pre-beard, but realized it is good ole dan'l boone himself, the guenther brothers founded blue grass canning co. circa 1895....great local history item...

Thank you. I thought it was pretty interesting also. Especially right here close. 

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45 minutes ago, Fenntucky Mike said:

No more than the gas powered meat grinder. xD 

i guess bout the same as two oxen turning a mill then...

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37 minutes ago, Fenntucky Mike said:

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Here's a couple of pics of a postcard, postmarked 1943, of downtown Fennville with the store front visible on the right side of the pic. For me, postcards are an essential piece of my token/scrip collection as most of the business are long gone, as well as some of the buildings. A postcard is probably one of the best ways to catch a glimpse of these stores while still in operation. 

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If you were to take a picture of downtown today it would look much the same as most of the buildings pictured are still standing.

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Very cool stuff. I love looking at the old historical buildings in pictures. I've seen old ones of my hometown with dirt streets and horses. The same old buildings are still there. Just blacktop now. Well most of the buildings. A couple has been torn down. And some meth heads burned down a couple when their meth lab blowed up. 

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55 minutes ago, Hoghead515 said:

Very cool stuff. I love looking at the old historical buildings in pictures. I've seen old ones of my hometown with dirt streets and horses. The same old buildings are still there. Just blacktop now. Well most of the buildings. A couple has been torn down. And some meth heads burned down a couple when their meth lab blowed up. 

Those post cards are very helpful, I have a whole mitt full of the little towns in my area. For example in the postcard above there is I.O.O.F. painted on the building, I just noticed this, and I did not know that there may have been a local lodge in the past. If there was it means that there probably is an I.O.O.F. token/medal with that lodge number stamped on it and possibly another piece for me to try and acquire. :grin: I've tried to limit myself to just my local county instead of the entire state but I may venture out in the future. 

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4 hours ago, Woods020 said:

I had been keeping an eye out for this token and found one of the top pops for this die pair. Alabama was a single merchant state regarding civil war tokens. There are 32 varieties known of the White & Swann tokens with a total maximum population of about 175 pieces per current rarity ratings (R-8 to R-10 depending on token) 

The origin of White & Swann is unknown. Based on research I have a suspicion that the two names mentioned stem from the following:

Swann Farms was a large player during the time and still operates as a 6th generation farm in the Huntsville area. 

 

James White and Andrew Beirne were Virginia gentlemen, of the old school, both scions of old and influential families of the Old Dominion, with many of the virtues of the vices of that splendid type of the Anglo American known as the Old Virginia cavalier stock. James White was for a time in partnership with Alexander Gilbreath, the pioneer merchant in the county. James White was a man of considerable means and invested largely in real estate, owning with other property a fine body of land on both sides of Tennessee river near Whitesburg, which town received its name from him. He was blessed with a large family, of which Thomas W. White and Gen’l Ad. White are the representatives in Alabama, many of his descendants living in Virginia, where the family owned a large property.

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Very cool token. Glad you found one my friend. That's awesome. 

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In 1911, Phil Greenwald opened Greenwald Drugs in Vicksburg, MS. It was a branch location of Keefe and Greenwald Grocers, which he co-owned with Patrick Keefe, Jr.

The only denomination issued was a 5 cent token. This token is rare, with only a handful known to exist.

 

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