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Trivia Question (Capped Bust Halves)

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In honor of a couple of folks who are starting up collections in this series, I figure I'll tantalize them a bit:

 

1. Al Overton published the most popularly used book on the series in use today, with Dr. Glenn Peterson's book an excellent companion for attribution. Whose work immediately preceded Overton's work? (No, it's not Capt. John Haseltine with his Type Table.)

 

2. The Bust Half community got very excited in the summer of 2000. Since the typing (or, attributing) of Bust Halves by Overton's predecessor, there's been a variety that's been plated but without a single confirmed specimen. Complicating matters all these 70+ years is that the obverse apparently failed early and is known only to have been married to a reverse die whose only other marriage is to an R.7 variety with 5 specimens extant. This discovery in the summer of 2000 confirmed the existence of this very rare variety. What variety is this? (Please answer with the Overton #.)

 

3. As mentioned above, the reverse die to #2 is married to an R.7 variety. Which variety is this? (Please answer with the Overton #.)

 

EVP

 

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I know who you mean but I cannot think of his name (I hate when that happens) and I cannot find my copy of his book right now. If I remember correctly it was printed in like 1934, the Hazelton reprint I have with additons by Max Mehl is dated 1927. I just have to many books around to keep track of them all.

 

 

AHHHH Finally remembered M. L. Beistle

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  • Member: Seasoned Veteran

It looks like RotatedRainbows scored on #1. Martin Luther Beistle published his book A Register of Half Dollar Die Varieties and Sub-Varieties in 1929, and it was reprinted by Aubrey and Adeline Bebee in 1964. The first edition is scarce but not rare, while the reprint turns up a bit more often. The book is obsolete on nearly all counts, and I don't recommend it except for collectors of numismatic literature.

 

Beistle coined the now forgotten term "akcidefect" to describe what we presently call die-clash marks. His more lasting contribution is as the inventor of the coin album. In 1928 his company, which produced paper novelty and holiday products, offered cardboard pages that were holed for the insertion of coins. The coins were then held in place by celluloid slides, a mechanism which is still used in today's more sophisticated albums with their much safer materials. The rights to distribute this product were bought by coin dealer Wayte Raymond, who added a line of three-ring binders to hold the pages and sold these complete albums under the title "National." Albums of this type were manufactured by Raymond's successor, Meghrig, as recently as 30 years ago.

 

The answer to #2 is 1795, O-132. I had the pleasure of authenticating and attributing the newly identified example when it was submitted to NGC at the time of its discovery.

 

The obverse of this variety is indeed unique to O-132 but, as EVP suggested, its reverse was also used to coin O-101.

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Needless to say, DWL is correct on all counts! (Thanks for answering!)

 

I wish someday I'd get lucky to discover a major rarity like this... I'd prefer it to be an Early Dollar, but I won't be picky!

 

smile.gif

 

EVP

 

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