For the love of copper
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Mike,

Did you know if you place a Sonic Care toothbrush to the side of that very nice 1919 Lincoln it will rotate in the holder and you can orient it right?

Lance.

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Mike,

Did you know if you place a Sonic Care toothbrush to the side of that very nice 1919 Lincoln it will rotate in the holder and you can orient it right?

Lance.

 

No I did not know. I don't have a Sonic, but maybe my wife has something?

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Mike,

Did you know if you place a Sonic Care toothbrush to the side of that very nice 1919 Lincoln it will rotate in the holder and you can orient it right?

Lance.

 

No I did not know. I don't have a Sonic, but maybe my wife has something?

 

:signfunny::devil::roflmao:

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Mike,

Did you know if you place a Sonic Care toothbrush to the side of that very nice 1919 Lincoln it will rotate in the holder and you can orient it right?

Lance.

 

No I did not know. I don't have a Sonic, but maybe my wife has something?

 

doh!

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You have bear with me. I am just beginning to invest in photo gear and taking pictures of everything trying to get some experience so I can take some really good photos. Of course having a nice coin to start with is probably more than half the battle. None the less - this is one attempt.

 

1909_VDB_Lincoln.jpg

 

 

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And now for something completely different yet full blooded copper:

 

Excerpts From Wikipedia:

 

Lord George Gordon (26 December 1751 – 12 November 1793) was a British politician best known for lending his name to the Gordon Riots of 1780.

 

A colourful personality, he was born into the Scottish nobility and became a member of parliament for Ludgershall. His life ended after a number of controversies, notably one surrounding his conversion to Judaism for which he was ostracised. He died in Newgate prison.

 

In 1779 he organised, and made himself head of, the Protestant Association, formed to secure the repeal of the Catholic Relief Act of 1778.

 

On 2 June 1780 he headed a crowd of around 50,000 people that marched in procession from St George's Fields to the Houses of Parliament in order to present a huge petition against (partial) Catholic Emancipation. After the mob reached Westminster the "Gordon Riots" began. Initially, the mob dispersed after threatening to force their way into the House of Commons, but reassembled soon afterwards and, over several days, destroyed several Roman Catholic chapels, pillaged the private dwellings of Catholics, set fire to Newgate Prison, broke open all the other prisons, and attacked the Bank of England and several other public buildings. The army was finally brought in to quell the unrest and killed or wounded around 450 people before they finally restored order.

 

For his role in instigating the riots, Lord George was charged with high treason. He was comfortably imprisoned in the Tower of London and permitted to receive visitors, including the Methodist leader Rev. John Wesley on Tuesday 19 December 1780.

 

In October 1793, Gordon caught typhoid fever, which had been raging in Newgate prison throughout that year. Christopher Hibbert, another biographer, writes that scores of prisoners waited outside the door to his cell for news about his health; friends, regardless of the risk of infection, stood whispering in the room and praying for his recovery - but George Yisrael bar Avraham Gordon died on 1 November 1793, 26 Mar-Cheshvan 5554, at the age of 42.

 

Middlesex777NGCMS65_zpsbfa22cc1.jpg

 

 

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Lots of cool material being posted. I am ready to play, but a recent accident has me sidelined for a few weeks so I cant get my newps properly imaged.

 

I would have my wife ship them, but that would just stir a lot of attention.

 

 

POST SOME RAINBOW COPPER FOR ME!!!!

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