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Know anything about cancelled modern coinage (waffles)?

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I am not sure what they call it, but it looks like it was ran through teeth gear sprockets to bend the coin into non-usable form. (redbook says started in mid 2003 and called waffles)

 

1- are these production errors or not meeting specs?

 

2- are they being salvaged from junk yards from waste haulers?

 

3- are 'new' ones being made by postmint damage enablers?

 

4- can double dies be found looking at coin (or whatever they are called)

 

an example of a quarter DC with -

 

DSC06928_zps2dfb73d5.jpg

DSC06931_zpsdbf96a93.jpg

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I've seen a few of these coins before. From what I've read, these "waffled" coins are rejects from the mint. The mint finds that they are flawed in some way or another and are sent through a large "cancellation" machine which distorts and ruins the coin for it's monetary use. How these coins slip out is a good question though. These coins are usually scrapped or melted, I believe. I've actually seen one of these waffled coins in a NGC holder too. I hope I'm not too far off from my description. If someone out there know's a little more about them, please correct me!

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I don't know if that is a mint reject or not, but the "waffled" coins I'm familiar with were produced intentionally by the Mint using cancelled dies. I had one of them. I believe it was a MO SQ.

 

Chris

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Did a Google search, found this in another forum:

 

"When the mint finds a problem on a coin and rejects it they run it through the "waffler" to "cancel" it and render it into a non-legal tender piece of scrap metal. In the past these rejected coins were not waffled and when they were shipped back to the coinage strip manufacturers for recycling they had to be accompanied by armed mint police for security because they were still legal tender and the security would have to remain until such time and the coins were melted down.

 

Now with waffling they are just scrap metal and the security measures are no longer needed. This results in a big savings for the Mint.

 

Now this scrap metal is offered for sal by the mint and it is usually purchased by the strip manufacturerers but it can be purchased by other metal recylers as well. Once it is purchased and they take possession of the scrap it belongs to them and they can do what ever they want with it. In some cases people have bought some of these waffled coins, they have had the coins slabbed and they offer them for sale.

 

Now you know about waffled coins

 

And before you think about making your own, the company that manufactures the waffler provides a different "crush pattern" to each purchaser so it would be possible to determine whether or not a coin was actually waffled by the mint or by someone else."

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I have a kennedy halfplanchet waffled and certified by NGC.

 

It's a cool "coin" that I show to people that aren't really into coin collecting and they think it's "wierd" "cool" "neat" and alot of other things and it sparks up a conversation and brings them into my world for a little bit.

 

 

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i like them extra cristy hot out of the iron with extra real unsalted whipped butter and sugarr free syrup

 

i prefer the butter that comes from contented cows that farm in vermont that does not use barbed wire to enclose the free range cows in the pasture this way if they try to get out they dont get pricked and this jolts the cow which makes for an extra creamy butter

 

with this farm they pen them in with wooden fences and extra watchmen which is of course cost more to raise but gives an extra creamry butter as the cows again dont get shocked by the sharp barbs on the olde fashioned barbed wire

 

but i guess regular land o lakes unsalted whipped butter will do

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