• When you click on links to various merchants on this site and make a purchase, this can result in this site earning a commission. Affiliate programs and affiliations include, but are not limited to, the eBay Partner Network.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Grading Services

9 posts in this topic

Recently I won 2 Morgans on a seized property auction. They were graded by Federal Certification Service as MS 65/65 in the late 1980s. I sent them to a coin dealer and was told they would grade at MS64 by today's standards. Also, I can't remember what checmical he said was present in the holder, but it's not good for coins longterm. (I think it's sulpher ??)

 

Also, Has anybody ever used Global Certfication Services?? Jerry

 

 

 

EDIT: I re-checked about the sulpher. The main reason I was confused because I thought the sulpher was in the plastic holder. It's not. It's in the cardboard insert that surrounds the coin inside the holder.

 

I looked at pictures of Global Certification Service on their website and they look pretty nice. There's a small write up on the holders about the coin. Also, on the inside sleeve of the book "100 GREATEST U.S. COINS" co-author, Jeff Garrett is said to be a co-owner of Global Certfication Services. However, I was just informed a little while ago that Jeff Garrett was no longer involved with GSC.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Recently I won 2 Morgans on a seized property auction. They were graded by Federal Certification Service as MS 65/65 in the late 1980s. I sent them to a coin dealer and was told they would grade at MS64 by today's standards. Also, I can't remember what checmical he said was present in the holder, but it's not good for coins longterm. (I think it's sulpher ??)

 

Also, Has anybody ever used Global Certfication Services?? Jerry

 

Sulpher is one of the main reasons coins tone.

 

GCS? Isn't that the company that only graded State Quarters for their first few months? If so, they suck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Global is the slabbing company that photo's the coin and has a (pretty decent) right-up about it. Nice holder.

 

Greg, remember that $1,500.00 toned Ike we saw at Long Beach about three Long Beaches ago? That was a Global holder.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Greg, remember that $1,500.00 toned Ike we saw at Long Beach about three Long Beaches ago? That was a Global holder.

 

Theawful ATed one that was still piping hot from the super well known coin doctor? Glad to know GCS is good at spotting problems.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Greg, Pat: Let's start a grading service. I can't think of a better way to make money in coins AND have everyone vilify us. Oh wait...I guess we could become dealers...never mind.

 

jom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Greg, Pat: Let's start a grading service. I can't think of a better way to make money in coins AND have everyone vilify us. Oh wait...I guess we could become dealers...never mind.

 

jom

 

And then grade them all PR70 and MS70! 27_laughing.gif

 

Leo

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK. When do I get paid? laugh.gif

 

jom

 

No, I don't think you'd ever get paid but rather, it would end up costing you more so than making a profit! 27_laughing.gif

First, you would need to write a computer program that would create several user names and ebay accounts and a program that would allow for auto shill bidding and adding feedback and then.......there's the manufacture of all the slabs, glue and printed labels.......... 27_laughing.gif

 

Leo

 

I would take it a step further and churn out one MS70 slab for every 100 MS67's and 10000 66's and 1 million 65's! 27_laughing.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sulfur is a common residual ingredient from the paper/cardboard manufacturing process. As Greg mentioned, it is a primary reason for coins to tone. However, if it is the plastic you are worried about then the culprit is PVC and this can only damage a coin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites