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1941s nickels with inverted mintmarks?

11 posts in this topic

I know that Coneca has removed these from their files, stating that they were just the result of punching the mint mark at an angle. I'm having a hard time seeing how that could cause the characteristics of the serifs to reverse. Can anyone explain Coneca's reasoning?

Here is a recent pocket change find. It is from a different die than the one pictured in the CP guide (mintmark position is further towards the rim). Even though it's well worn, it looks like an upside-down mint mark to me. confused.gif

 

1941s5cimm.jpg

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Spiny,

I read something about the mint mark being struck at an angel recently. I'm guessing due to the angel, the top part of the mint mark appeared normal and the lower part appeared thicker due to not getting the same amount of pressure. It only appears to be upside down.

 

I'm not sure if I have the terminology correct but hopefully one of the better numismatically minded collectors here can give a better explaination.

 

Dave

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I also read this recently and was relieved that they removed the designation. I've viewed a few of these so-called upside-down mint mark coins, and I have never been able to see what anyone was talking about. I always thought that if you simply rotated the coin slightly, the mm looked normal.

 

As for your picture, it looks to me like many of the 1938-41-S mint marks (except the large S of '41). Looks like there had been a bit of die chipping in the upper serif, which is common for all San Francisco coins in the series.

 

Thanks for the post!

 

Hoot

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I don't have another 41S to show the difference. Sounds like a good reason to go visit the coin shop... smile.gifhi.gif

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I don't know about this date, but there is at least one war nickel that has an inverted S mint mark. I've owned a few of them over the years (including some slabbed ones) and while it is extremely hard to tell the difference, you can see it if you know what to look for.

 

BTW, they sell extremely well. thumbsup2.gif

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if you love the 41 s nicks they are cool coins

 

and all the controversy

 

 

 

then you should get into the 41 s walkers there is a really great coin

 

try to find a true gem ms65 coin that has an above average strike

 

there is no such thing as a full strike

 

i have seen one or two that come really close but they were not gem but close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades

 

michael

 

on the 41 s nicks with so called inverted mintmark i have seen a few and even in a strong light with a strong glass tilted the right way i still cant really tell the difference ........................

 

depends on the day sometimes i can barely see it( what i call and optical dillusion)))))

 

and all the other daYS it is just not there to my minds eye

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Cool. I didn't know about the war nickels. I looked at the few I have and agree that it would be tough to tell. It looks to me like the lower serif is just slightly longer than the upper.

 

I struck out at the coin shop, but jtwax has a couple pictures on his web page. On the normal mint mark it looks like the upper serif is smaller with a straight face and a notch behind it, while the lower serif is larger and more bulbous.

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CONECA's decision was based on James Wiles's comparisons of several EDS specimins of the 41-S and reported that the punch was tilted giveing the effect of an inverted Mint Mark. The same can be said for a 1945-S war nickel I purchased at a Long Beach show for $1.50, which I sent to Bill Fivas for examination. He wrote back to me with the same annalysis that Wiles came up with on the 41-S. However, I am still not fully satisfied with the results of the 45-S being a "tilted punch".

 

Here is a photo of a normal 45-S Mint Mark. Notice how the bottom serif is fatter than the upper...

 

normal.jpg

 

Here is a photo of the supposed inverted 45-S Mint Mark. Notice how the top serif is now the fatter...

 

inverted.jpg

 

Lastly, here is an overlay of the normal Normal Mint mark over the top of the inverted one... You decide...

 

overlay.jpg

 

Regards,

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Yes, thanks for the post Jason! It looks pretty convincing, especially when I reinverted the mm (outlined in red) and overlayed it on the normal mm.

 

reinverted.jpg

 

But, then I dug out my set of unc war nickels (I was looking at some circ ones before) and I think I understand the angled punch theory now. The upper serif on my 45S is thicker than the lower serif, yet the lower serif looks the same as the other years. If the punch would have came in from a more acute NE angle then only the higher points of the lower serif would transfer and it would look more like yours. Sound reasonable?

 

warnicksmm.jpg

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Sounds about right. I guess one would really enver know for sure. Doing the layovers (I like yours by the way!) usually is our best bet but sometimes they still don't help much.

 

On another note, your 42-S is a nice $ die crack. As a matter of fact it appears that it is a different die from the one I have - can you shoot me a photo to match the one up on my site so I may add it?

 

$ Die Cracks

 

Regards,

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