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If, for example, a VG-8 is "conservatively graded", then would you expect...

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... that it looks like it could really be VG-10? or F-12?

 

(This is assuming, of course, you believe any coins actually are conservatively graded :o;) ... )

 

In other words, does an apparently "conservative grade", seem to be a full grade too low, or too low by the next available increment? Personally, I think the latter.

 

 

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I think conservatively graded means that on average, most experienced graders would agree that it should be the next higher grade. The difference between VG-8 and VG-10 is insignificant, and a group of experienced graders could call a VG-8 coin anything in the range between G-6 and VG-10. Now, if a group of experienced graders would agree the coin should be F-12, I would say that it was undergraded.

 

I guess what I'm trying to say is - the difference needs to be great enough for it to be significant. VF-20 and VF-25 are within the tolerances of subjectivity; VF-20 and VF-30 are far enough apart.

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When someone says that it's a "conservative VG8" I would expect that to mean that it is PQ for the grade, and may have a chance at upgrading.
I don't think the person should describe the coin as "conservatively graded" if he doesn't think it should grade higher upon resubmission.

 

With respect to the original question, the person who is providing the opinion would be better off being more specific. For example, he could say that the coin looks like a solid VG 10. Or that it looks like a Fine 12, Fine 15, whatever.

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I would suspect a "conservatively graded VG8" not to be a lock upgrade but rather a no brainer, solid 8.

I would think that out of a hundred collectors within that series, not a single one would grade it a GD04 or a GD06.

 

In other words, show me a conservatively graded VG8 Chain cent and no one would think it is only a good.

 

On the other hand, very few would call it a FN12 or possibly a VG10.

 

Not an automatic upgrade but no way a lower grade. That is conservative grading, IMHO.

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I agree with the previous post. Since grading is so subjective, I would say a conservatively graded coin is one which "most" graders would agree with, and that many may grade a bit higher.

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For me "conservatively graded" translates to having some characteristics of the next grade up but not enough to be called that grade. A true tweener of a coin. It just sounds better than PQ or undergraded, etc.

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James----I think that I have a really decent coin that sort of fits your question.

 

Look at my 1921D Walker from my second registry set. PCGS graded it a VG8. That coin has a lot of character----but one rim bump that "DOES NOT" affect the reeding in any way.

 

When I sent it in, I expected honestly a VG10 grade----I had hopes for a fine12 but felt they would not give me that because of the bump. I only have 250 in the coin----so it is not a matter of money. Since it is also an original coin, it did make it tough for me to see it as just a VG8

 

If today I was offered the coin at a retail VG8 price, I'd buy it in a heartbeat----and go from there. Take care. Bob [supertooth]

 

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