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Odd Japanese Gold Coins on eBay

6 posts in this topic

Thoughts?

 

1871 10 Yen

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=280429397994

 

1872 5 Yen

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=290374415446

 

1877 Silver Trade Dollar

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=280429401458

 

All private auctions of uncertified high-value coins.

 

The roughness near the denticles on the 10 yen looks funny.

 

The kanji on the wreath-side of the trade dollar has small differences from my two slabbed 1876 trade dollars. I'm not aware of any documented variations in stroke. Anyone know for sure?

 

Otherwise the details are sharp on all 3 coins.

 

No, I'm not bidding :)

 

-Mike

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Details are sharp on all three coins. The silver looks the most original. I can't help you with the small differences from your slabbed coins. The gold coins are very clean, the color on the first makes we wonder if has been dipped sometime in the past. Unless they are counterfeits, they look like nice examples for a type set.

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Thanks, I guess my main concern is that the 1871 10 yen lists in Krause (4th Ed) as $3000 in fine, $4500 in XF, $6000 in UNC. Wouldn't one expect such an expensive coin to be slabbed by a respected TPG, to maximize profit?

 

If it's a counterfeit, it's very convincing in the photos.

 

Well, it'll be interesting to see what it closes at.

 

-Mike

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Thanks, I guess my main concern is that the 1871 10 yen lists in Krause (4th Ed) as $3000 in fine, $4500 in XF, $6000 in UNC. Wouldn't one expect such an expensive coin to be slabbed by a respected TPG, to maximize profit?

 

That would be my preference. I would be very careful purchasing raw coins at this level sight unseen.

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The kanji on the wreath-side of the trade dollar has small differences from my two slabbed 1876 trade dollars. I'm not aware of any documented variations in stroke. Anyone know for sure?
For other coins, the Japanese Numismatic Dealers Assn. catalog illustrates a number of calligraphy variations not shown in Krause, or other references; but there is no indication of any such varieties on the TD.

 

I'm in the middle of a computer update, and my pictures of known genuine TDs aren't readily available to compare, but minor calligraphy variations are a common feature of Chinese "replicas". Add that to the generally ugly appearance, and despite the bargain value bid so far, I'll join you in not bidding.

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Wouldn't one expect such an expensive coin to be slabbed by a respected TPG, to maximize profit?

 

No. High value world coins trade mainly raw. The TPGs have certified a tiny fraction of all the valuable world coins. While foreign buyers are increasing of their acceptance of and desire to have certified coins, it is mainly US buyers who expect certified coins.

 

Besides, this seller is in Australia and non-US deslers sending in coins for certification is still a rarity.

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