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"BLAKESLEY EFFECT"

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Does the Blakesley effect happen more on straight clipped or curved clipped coins? Does it happen more often on coins that have a certain percentage of the coin clipped out?

 

Coolcoin

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I would think that the effect is different given a straight "clip" (incomplete planchet) vs. a curved clip. Since the Blakesley effect is simply a deformation of the planchet opposite a "clip," I doubt that its manifestation is greater or lesser due to the geometry of the clip, more than the mass of the clip. The geometry of the mass displacement opposite that of the clip may be different given the geometry of the clip, but ultimately, I would imagine that the mass, the fluid dynamical properties of the metal, the relative mass to edge ratio, the diameter and thickness of the planchet, and the pressure under which it is struck all have more to do with the mass of the ultimate displacement. Just some logical reasoning...

 

Hoot

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Mark,

 

Neat answer but what does mass have to do with it? Different coins have different mass because they are different sizes.

 

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Coolcoin

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Mark,

Very good discription about the displacement of mass. Does this error happen to all clipped coins? I am inclined to think it only happens to coins with a certain percentage of the coin clipped out from it.

 

COOLCOIN

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You are correct that it does not happen in every case. Just goes to show that the striking pressure is not perfectly "even" across the planchet, for a myriad of reasons (planchet thickness, metal density, design, etc., etc.).

 

Hoot

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