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Help with this possible 1980 COPPER DIME?

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Ok, the dime has an all copper edge, but it does have a reeded edge. So I'm guessing it is most likely a dime missing both clad layers?

 

You would have to weigh it to determine that, as outlined above. If the weight is different from expected, it most likely is missing layers. If the weight is as it should be, then it is toned funny, or something like that.

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Just to throw another mix into the equation, it just might be a normal dime that has been electroplated with a thin layer of copper, you know, just someone fooling around on a dull night shift...experimenting and then spending it in the companies Coke machine.

 

Need to have a professional in error coins take a physical look at it to determine just exactly what is going on here, something is, but what?

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Whats the best professional service to send it to for an error like this?

 

CONECA, but before spending the money to send it anywhere, I'd weight it, first.

 

Chris

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Whats the best professional service to send it to for an error like this?
CONECA, but before spending the money to send it anywhere, I'd weight it, first.
ICG will put the CONECA attribution information on the insert. Check out this CONECA ICG Attribution Information page. There's been some recent changes at ICG but the relationship and service may still be in place.
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First of all, welcome to the forum, Wildstar! :hi: (cool name!)

 

I would suggest taking the coin to a jewelers' and having it weighed - in grams, if possible. A normal dime is approx 2.27 grams, and a dime missing both clad layers would weigh about 1.7 grams.

 

I think you're allowing too much weight for the clad layer.

 

Chris

 

I think you are right, Chris. I couldn't find a calculator, so I tried to do the math in my head - too much empty space up there for complicated calculations. :)

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The coin is almost certainly just a discolored dime.

 

First a dime on a cent planchet is not possible, especially with a reeded edge since it can't be handled by the feeding tubes or feeder for the press and it can't fit into the coining chamber. Since it can't fit into the coining chamber it can't receive the reeded edge.

 

This leaves three possibilities, a dime missing both clad layers, struck on a foreign planchet, or just discolored.

 

If it was missing both clad layers you would expect to see a lot of weakness in the design and the coin will be significantly underweight. The strong strike on this coin would seem to rule out this possibility.

 

I haven't checked to see if there were any foreign coins of the proper size and made of a copper alloy struck in Denver that year, but the chances of it being a foreign planchet are MUCH less likely than the coin just being discolored..

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I'm very happy to see something just like this, It's very similar to something I have, I don't Remeber the exact Year because It has been sealed away in a 2x2 ever since I found it.

 

Back in 2000 I was working as a manager at Mcdonalds, Since it was near a resort casino in Arizona we always got people coming in towards the end of the month with all sorts of different things. It started with Red seal notes, Franklin half dollars, to silver Quarters and Dimes. Being such a small store I was very freindly with the owner and we grew to become great freinds(so taking 1 dollar out of the till for 2 franklin half dollars was not an issue at any time). I worked there close to 90 hours a weeks, I couldn't beleive some of the stuff I was finding, But back to the story. I was opening a brand new bank roll of shiny BU dimes(I usually broke open the new rolls when it was slow so I could search through for some maybe to find a common error), I had noticed that it was copper! I had grabbed the coin from the rim being very careful since I had just broke it out of a brand new bank roll, The Reverse Is Obviously missing the Clad layer! The Reverse is a shiny BU copper color!

 

I Will post the Pictures when I get it back from NGC Graded, Since I can't take very good pictures!

 

Thats awsome to see another coin Like it, but it looks like yours in missing the complete clad layer on both sides, Very cool!

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If it was missing both clad layers you would expect to see a lot of weakness in the design and the coin will be significantly underweight. The strong strike on this coin would seem to rule out this possibility.

 

I have to disagree with this assumption. Take a look at the Kennedy on my sig line. There is no weakness of strike evident on the devices.

 

Chris

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If it was missing both clad layers you would expect to see a lot of weakness in the design and the coin will be significantly underweight. The strong strike on this coin would seem to rule out this possibility.

 

I have to disagree with this assumption. Take a look at the Kennedy on my sig line. There is no weakness of strike evident on the devices.

 

Chris

 

I have to agree with you Chris. I do not believe that the coin is simply discolored due to both the evenness of the copper coloring. It looks very apparent to me (and I admit I am far from an expert) the the coin is coppper.

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The coin is almost certainly just a discolored dime.

 

First a dime on a cent planchet is not possible, especially with a reeded edge since it can't be handled by the feeding tubes or feeder for the press and it can't fit into the coining chamber. Since it can't fit into the coining chamber it can't receive the reeded edge.

 

This leaves three possibilities, a dime missing both clad layers, struck on a foreign planchet, or just discolored.

 

If it was missing both clad layers you would expect to see a lot of weakness in the design and the coin will be significantly underweight. The strong strike on this coin would seem to rule out this possibility.

 

I haven't checked to see if there were any foreign coins of the proper size and made of a copper alloy struck in Denver that year, but the chances of it being a foreign planchet are MUCH less likely than the coin just being discolored..

 

Where can you check to see if any foreign coins of the same size and copper alloy were struck in Denver that year? Thanks!

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I posted a dime about a month ago that was struck on a copper planchet..which most everyone said was impossible and was probably just discolored because "it can't be that well struck if its missing the clad layer"....mine weighed at around 1.8 grams...I'll post a picture again if I can find it in my mess I call desk drawers..I had forgotten about it, if you had it in hand there is no doubt it is copper and not a dirty clad coin.....glad to see someone else found one also..

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Where can you check to see if any foreign coins of the same size and copper alloy were struck in Denver that year? Thanks!

 

Foreign Coins Struck At United States Mints by Charles C. Altz and E. H. Barton

 

I have one but it's old ( 1965 ), so that won't help here. Sorry.

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I have to disagree with this assumption. Take a look at the Kennedy on my sig line. There is no weakness of strike evident on the devices.

Is it missing BOTH clad layers?

 

I posted a dime about a month ago that was struck on a copper planchet..which most everyone said was impossible and was probably just discolored because "it can't be that well struck if its missing the clad layer"....mine weighed at around 1.8 grams..

So I may be wrong about the strength of the strike, but the weight was significantly low, So that is still a very important test.

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