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Toned Quarter

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Here is a scan of a 1958-D Washington Quarter. This is the most unusual toning for a Wasington Quarter that I have ever seen.

 

The scan is close but did not pick up the green on the reverse. There is a peripheral bright green ring of toning that circles the complete reverse. See attached.

57164-1958DWashQuart2.jpg.bf14ff94f6b7feafec70de7c3d06f7f3.jpg

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I have a '64 qtr that looks like that. It got that way from sitting on my desk on a jeweler's tray for 4 years or so. Very vibrant colors. Looks very a/t, but I swear I didn't do anything to but ignore it.

 

It's not worth much...

 

EVP

 

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Cool looking quarter, but does look AT to me. There is a good article about AT, and some interesting suggestions to experiment if you are so inclined, at tombeckeronline.com. You have to register but it's free. The article is under Collecting and is titled, Truth about Cleaning Coins.

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I was trying to find the Article before I responded. However, you probably are correct in your assessment of AT. The coin is in a NGC slab and is staying there. The coin is wild in it's shades of red and green. The green on the reverse does not show well (you can see it in the letters only) and that is too bad because it is a bright-pastel lime shade of green. It makes the coin look like a Xmas decoration. tongue.gif

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It looks to me like regular, deep mint set toning that is common on late 1950's silver coins . I have seen many coins just like it, and the toning pattern is very natural looking and typical, from what I can see. Sometimes the colors are bright and vivid, and sometimes they are very dark. And then, sometimes, there is a combination of both. My guess, based on what I have said and the fact the it resides in an NGC slab, is that it is natural toning.

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I posted it because it has rather unique colors. I wish that the green on the reverse had come out in the scan, it really is a unique color mixture. Oh well. tongue.gif

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1958 was the last year mint sets were packaged directly in cardboard. After that coins were in plastic.

 

Another thing is the Mint made over 50,000 mint sets in '58. If you look before '54 the mintages were 15,000 or less. So it makes sense that the most mint set toned silver should be dated '54-'58.

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Charlie - I also think the coin is naturally toned. I have seen a few coins come out of the cardboard the Mint shipped them in and they can be wild. Sulfer colors. EVP living in NYC probably has a high sulfer content to the air. I love coins toned that way.

 

Hoot

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Yeah, so what if I'm breathing lousy air. At least my silvers will look nice! BTW, I moved from that location. This new place has better air (closer to the river), but my coins aren't toning as quickly either. Oh, well. You win one, lose another!

 

EVP

 

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